Posts Tagged With: Letting go of worry

Day 3182: Freaking out

Yesterday, I asked this question on Twitter about freaking out:

People were freaking out about many things, including money, health issues, work, family members, relationships, the pandemic, other people’s behaviors, etc., etc., etc. Indeed, some people suggested that a better question might have been “What are you NOT freaking out about right now?”

I didn’t answer my own question, but I was freaking out about our kitty Joan, her ongoing mastitis, and how she outsmarts us and every cone we put on her to promote its healing.

There’s Joan, trying to figure out how she can lick her wounds after my husband Michael tried to adapt her cone with a well-placed paper clip.

When I freak out, it’s usually because I feel helpless, so yesterday I ordered TWO MORE cones in addition to the inflatable cone that’s being delivered today.

Joan’s irritated area extends down into the top of her rear leg, so it’s very difficult to get a cone that completely prevents her from accessing it with her rough kitty tongue. Also, most cat post-surgery body suits don’t cover that area.

Over the past month, as we’ve treated her with antibiotics, applied topical lotion to the area, sent lots of pictures of the area to the vet, and helped Joan adjust to the different types of treatment (while trying to bond with her), we’ve seen the problem area get better and then get worse.

It freaks me out that I know so much about trying to help a cat heal, but we’re still not past this.

When I freak out, Michael tries to calm me by focusing on the positive: she’s not in pain, it’s not going to kill her, and she will get better, even if it takes much longer than we expected.

When I freak out, it also helps me to write about it in this blog. This blog — and all of you — have helped me get through many freak outs over the years.

Let’s see if the Daily Bitch is all about freaking out today.

It is!

Here’s what I find on YouTube when I search for “freaking out.”

What might you be freaking out about right now? Whatever it is, chances are you’re not alone.

I have so much freaking gratitude for all who help me write this daily blog, including YOU!

Categories: cats, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 3160: How not to be wrong

How not to be wrong starting a blog post? I’m just repeating today’s title and letting it flow from there.

“How Not to Be Wrong” is one of the books I’m reading/not reading on my two-week vacation from work.

Personally, I think I spend too much time thinking about how not to be wrong, which can inhibit what I say and do. These days, I’m embracing mistakes as learning experiences and spending less time worrying about the consequences of being wrong.

Granted, it’s very important for us not to be wrong about our health and safety — for ourselves and others. For example, if I forget to take my Coumadin and if I don’t eat a consistent amount of vitamin K, my mechanical heart valve might clog and fail. So I need to think about not being wrong about THAT every day. Also, there are a lot of creatures that depend on me, so I don’t want to be wrong in such a way that jeopardizes their future.

However, I’m not wrong about knowing myself well enough to choose to focus on accepting that I WILL be wrong, every day, and that not every mistake will result in disaster.

Do you see any examples of how not to be wrong in my other images for today?

How not to be wrong on August 26, 2021 MIGHT include having a cherry popsicle, but I don’t think I’m wrong in saying that women’s equality day should be every day.

By the way, usually I spend more time arranging the order of the images in my blog posts — is it wrong that today I’m not worrying about how not to be wrong in creating a good enough post for you?

Here’s what I find on YouTube when I search for “how not to be wrong”:

How not to be wrong about guessing how much time you have to watch a video today:

How not to be wrong about sharing your thoughts and feelings about any of my blog posts? Leave a comment, below.

How not to be wrong about any interaction with other people? Express gratitude when you can.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Day 3096: The people who are grabbing your attention now

Who are the people who are grabbing your attention now, besides me?

I often grab people’s attention by pointing out that the people who are grabbing our attention are often the difficult ones. They grab our attention because we experience them as a problem, even a danger, and our mind wants to find a “solution” to make our environment safer.

Last night, when I thought I might lose sleep because of people who were grabbing my attention, I tweeted this:

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This response to that tweet grabbed my attention:

Thank goodness, one person who was grabbing my attention yesterday was my old student, Chris Delyani, writer extraordinaire, who wishes me well and who has previously appeared in this blog (here, here, and here). I hope the word “old” doesn’t grab Chris’s attention in a negative way, because he looks great!

Chris and I grabbed each other’s attention yesterday by reminiscing about when he was a student in my writing section at Boston University in the 1980s. Now he is grabbing people’s attention with his wonderful books.

Chris and I grabbed my husband Michael’s attention when we told the story of how Chris and my other students had graded the printed directions I had given them to find my place for a celebratory party at the end of the semester. Mimicking the way I had graded and commented on their papers, they wrote (among other things):

“These directions were okay — they got us there, but we couldn’t tell how you FELT about it.”

“You show unspeakable talent… C+

Chris and my other students also grabbed my attention back then by correcting my one spelling mistake on the directions — I wrote “wonderous” instead of “wondrous.” That grabbed my attention so much that I’ve never misspelled that word since.

What grabs your attention in my other images from yesterday and why?

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Is “Cool” from West Side Story grabbing your attention now?

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It’s grabbing my attention now that this …

… was my attempt to photograph Michael’s attention-grabbing, very cool flounder-with-mango dish last night. Oh well.

Feel free to grab my attention with any comment you leave, below.

Images of gratitude always grab my attention, so thanks to all who helped me create today’s post, including YOU!

Categories: friendship, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, psychology | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Day 3058: Very busy brains

Two nights ago, when my very busy brain woke me up and prevented me from getting back to sleep, I tweeted this …

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I received very many helpful responses about very busy brains.

My very busy brain did come up with this mantra a month ago: “I am at peace. We are all one, connected.“ However, when my very busy brain is interfering with my sleep, I have trouble remembering it! This reminds me of the very first time I ever noticed the very busy Jeff Goldblum.

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Do you see evidence of very busy brains in my other images for today?

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Just like Scorpio Rising …

… I calm my very busy brain by spending time in nature and photographing it. Here are some photos I took within 20 busy miles from where I grew up:

Very busy brains tend to go into the future, often with worry about what will be. We need to refocus, over and over again, on the precious present moment.

My very-busy-brained husband, Michael, suggested yesterday that we calm our very busy brains by committing, once again, to no worry for a year. We tried that once before, starting in April 2019, and, unfortunately, our brains got very busy with worry in March of 2020, when I and very many other people came down with COVID.

Do any other very busy brains want to join me and Michael in committing to no worry for a year?

My very busy brain goes into the future and the past, so here’s one of my very favorite TV show theme songs from the distant past:

My very busy brain looks forward to some very busy activity in the comments section, below.

Finally, here’s some very busy gratitude for all who help me create these very busy posts, including YOU!

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Day 2921: Unexpected gifts

During a holiday season when we did not exchange any material gifts, there were still unexpected gifts, including delicious vegetarian manicotti and Christmas cookies from my ex-in-laws.

I also got some unexpected gifts mailed to me from work.

Here’s another unexpected gift: the bitcoin that I won from my wager on the results of the USA Presidential election has already increased by 26%! That is even more of a gift because when I collected my winnings recently from the online betting site I was agonizing over my unexpected inability to figure out how to convert bitcoin into cash. My husband Michael, who is always a gift to me, suggested I just keep the bitcoin and “have fun watching it.” Having fun with the unexpected is always a gift.

Do you see unexpected gifts in these recent images?

Another unexpected gift — I am no longer worrying about pissing people off. That’s because of the gift that keeps on giving: therapy.

When I search YouTube for “unexpected gifts” this comes up first:

Are there any unexpected gifts you would like to share in a comment below?

An expected gift at the end of each of my daily posts is the gift of gratitude, so thanks to all who contributed unexpected gifts today, including YOU!

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, Psychotherapy | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Day 2890: Insights

Here are some insightful quotes about insights:

“When you want wisdom and insight as badly as you want to breathe, it is then you shall have it.” — Socrates

“Knowing many things doesn’t teach insight.” — Heraclitus

“A moment’s insight is sometimes worth a life’s experience.” — Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.

“We are surrounded by data, but starved for insights.” — Jay Baer

“To understand another human being you must gain some insight into the condition that made him what he is.” — Margaret Bourke-White

“Insight occurs when, and to the degree that, one knows oneself.” — Andrew Schneider

“Great insight comes from seeing something as odd and finding out why.” — Philip Kotler

“When you let go, you lose pain and gain insight.” — Alexandra Stoddard

“The best vision is insight.” — Malcolm Forbes

“You cannot transmit wisdom and insight to another person. The seed is already there. A good teacher touches the seed, allowing it to wake up, to sprout, and to grow.” — Thich Nhat Hahn

“Discovery is the journey; insight is the destination.” — Gary Hamel

“Do not let anyone, of any sex, tell you that your intuitions and insights, your wisdom and your understandings, are somehow second-rate and not to be trusted.” Neale Donald Walsch

Yesterday, I trusted my insights enough to share this on Twitter:

One person’s platitude might be another person’s revelation, and vice versa.

Are there insights in any of these images?

Here’s Julien Marchal (who has many insights on YouTube) with “Insight XX.”

Feel free to share any insights in a comment below.

Thanks to all whose insights help me create this daily blog, including YOU!

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, quotes | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 2813: Plan ahead

I don’t plan ahead very much for these blog posts. Instead, I often let my recent photos plan ahead for me.

I like to plan ahead for what might go wrong with something that’s important to me. For example, I planned ahead for last night’s high school Zoom reunion by preparing for the unlikely eventuality that I — as sole host for the event — might suddenly lose the internet or electrical power, which would have ended the reunion for everybody, despite all our planning ahead.

When other people are spending too much time planning ahead for unlikely problems, I invite them to let go of the worry by assigning a percentage to the possibility of it happening. People on the reunion planning committee tried to point out to me that my losing power was sooooo unlikely that I should forget about it. Instead, I spent hours planning ahead how to make somebody else from the reunion committee a cohost, so the Zoom reunion could continue without me if need be.

The Zoom reunion went great, without any major unplanned glitches except this one: despite (or perhaps because of) all my planning ahead, I was too distracted to remember to start taping the reunion until after I sang my introductory song “We Grew Up in the Sixties and We’re in our Sixties Now” which I started planning ahead to perform months ago. Well, as they say, “Man plans. God laughs.”

As I plan ahead for the rest of my life, I plan to spend less time planning ahead for unlikely negative possibilities and more time enjoying the current moment. In other words, I plan to follow my own advice to others about planning ahead.

I rarely plan ahead when I capture the moment in images like these:

I planned ahead for that white board to show up in my Zoom frame last night, and it did.

Last night, we planned ahead for an in-person repeat of our 50th reunion when it’s safe to do so, which reminds me of this:

Without planning ahead, I found “Plan Ahead” by Allan Sherman:

I plan ahead to read all planned and unplanned comments on this post.

If you were planning ahead to see some gratitude from me for everyone who helped me create this post, here it is!

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

Day 2810: Watch

People who watch this blog may have noticed this watch in yesterday’s post:

That is a Fossil shrapnel-guard watch which reminds me of one of the first watches I ever bought. It mimics World War I watches used when people had to watch out for shrapnel while still needing to watch their watches.

Watch what my mind does when I think about watches with shrapnel guards — “So shrapnel guards helped protect the watches but what about the hand wearing the watch?”

Watch where my mind goes next: “When danger is all around, I guess some protection is better than none.”

Now it’s time to watch what I’ve watched recently through my iPhone:

If you watch this blog carefully, you may know that I use a magic wastepaper basket in my “Coping and Healing” groups. Yesterday, I watched while people in a telehealth group threw worry into my magic wastepaper basket (along with markers that no longer work).

Based on what I’ve watched over the years, worry never helps. If you are worrying, watch it! And watch out for worry about worry, which doesn’t help either.

What are you watching these days? Michael and I are still watching Match Game reruns. I like watching those because it’s a group of funny and spontaneous people who obviously like each other, having a good time. Also host Gene Rayburn reminds me a little of my late father (and if you watch this blog, you know it was my dad’s birthday yesterday).

Here‘s the Match Game episode Michael and I watched last night:

Because I watched some information about that “Trench Hand” episode, I know that viewers joined in the fun by sending in donations, which the show gave to a worthy cause.

I also watch that 1970s U.S. game show with new eyes, based on all that I’ve watched since then.

I’ll be watching for comments from you about this “Watch” post. Watch this space for gratitude, every day!

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Day 2746: Does worry help?

“Does worry help?” is a question I have asked many, many (and don’t worry how many) people, over the years.

What’s your first guess, best guess about the answer?

Don’t worry, I’ll tell you answer. It’s a resounding NO.

Yesterday, people discussed the difference between worry and planning AND the difference between worry and caring.

Despite our confusion about those concepts, it is very possible to plan without worry and to care without worry, although separating those out takes work.

Does it help to worry about Oscar during his last days?

No, but it helps to plan and to care.

Does it help to worry about any of my photos here today?

Does it help to worry about procrastination or instant gratification? Coincidentally, last night my son and my husband were discussing the benefits of procrastination. Aaron said that procrastination involves getting a lot of other things done while you’re procrastinating. Also, procrastination makes you work efficiently, because you’re doing things quickly at the last minute.

Am I worried about my son? No.

Does worry help as I look for a dance number from Top Hat, which Oscar and I watched yesterday?

Does it help to worry about the weather? Not according to Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire.

Does gratitude help? Always.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 2508: Flow

Two days ago, I drew this flow chart on my office white board for somebody who was trying to decide what action to take in a very difficult family situation.

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Then, in a flow of  synchronicity, somebody who used to participate in my Coping and Healing groups sent me this flowchart in an email:

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I love the way that flow chart keeps flowing into the same conclusion.

Are you ready for the flow of lots of other photos?

 

Last night, my dear friend Jeanette flowed into town from Philadelphia and shared our dinner, flowing conversations, photos of a Nailed It! cake and her trick-or-treating dog Gidget, and also this:

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It looks like that kitty has some opinions.  Go with the flow and don’t worry about it!

Here‘s a review of the book Flow by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi:

 

Here’s “Flow” by Shawn James:

 

I look forward to the flow of comments below, because

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Are you ready for the flow of gratitude for all who help me create these daily posts, including YOU?

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Categories: friendship, group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 23 Comments

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