definition

Day 1819: Buzzwords

During any busy and buzzy times of the year (like now), I notice buzzwords.

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Do I hear a buzz in the audience about the meaning of buzzwords?

buzz·word
ˈbəzˌwərd/
noun informal
plural noun: buzzwords
a word or phrase, often an item of jargon, that is fashionable at a particular time or in a particular context.

I have a  simpler definition of “buzzwords.”

Words creating a buzz.

I think it’s important to pay attention to the words buzzing around us.

Do you see any buzzwords in my other photos from yesterday?

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Sweets give me a sugar buzz, especially this time of the year. Which buzzwords are buzzing around you, right now?

Here‘s a  “buzzwords” video buzzing on YouTube:

Here‘s another one:

Here‘s one with music:

Feel free to create a buzz in the comments section, below, with your buzzwords.

Finally, the best buzzwords for all who helped me create this post and for you (of course!) are ….

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(a buzz of anticipation)

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Day 1811: Throw Aways

Let’s start this throw-away post with a  definition of “throw away.”

throw·a·way

ˈTHrōəˌwā
adjective
adjective: throw-away
1. denoting or relating to products that are intended to be discarded after being used once or a few times.
“a throwaway camera”
synonyms: disposable, single-use, nonreturnable, unrecyclable
“throwaway packaging”
2. (of a remark) expressed in a casual or understated way.
“some people overreacted to a few throwaway lines”
synonyms: casual, passing, careless, unthinking, unstudied, unconsidered, offhand; underemphasized
“throwaway remarks”
noun
noun: throw-away
1. a thing intended or destined to be discarded after brief use or appeal.

Here are a few throwaway lines from me:

  • Some years ago I asked Michael, “Did you throw away the cards and letters I received from clients when I left my previous job?”
  • Michael said he would not throw away anything valuable and he was sure they’d show up some day.
  • The cards and letters have never shown up, so I assume they were accidentally thrown away.
  • My memories of my previous clients remain in my heart and mind, never to be thrown away.
  • It looks like Michael did throw away my favorite boots.

 

  • I don’t think Michael meant to throw away my boots. I think he temporarily threw them in the wastebasket while he was cleaning.
  • I fear that the new U.S. tax bill is going to throw away a lot of valuable things.
  • If my fears are true, I’m hoping the “careless, unthinking, unstudied, unconsidered”  parts of the tax bill that Congress is almost certainly “passing” will be “discarded after a brief use.”
  • Yesterday,  I won a box of chocolates that I will not throw away.

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Here are some more throw-away photos  from my non-throwaway camera.

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If everything I’ve ever wanted is on the other side of fear, I guess it’s time to throw away fear.

The FCC has thrown away Net Neutrality and I wonder how that’s going to affect my throwing in YouTube videos like this one (which came up when I searched on “throw away”):

 

Let’s not throw away our shots.

Please leave any throwaway remarks below.

As always, thanks for reading my throwaway lines, here and now.

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 33 Comments

Day 1810: What do you know!

What do you know!  It’s the eighteen hundred and tenth consecutive day of blogging here at The Year(s) of Living Non-Judgmentally.

“What do you know!”  is (according to people who know)

something you say when you are surprised by a piece of information.

What do you know!  I facilitated two therapy groups yesterday where people talked about what they know, including their

  • feelings,
  • thoughts,
  • experiences, and
  • choices.

What do you know!  I took these photos yesterday:

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What do you know!  When I read out loud what I’d written, directly above, somebody in that group said, “You should start a blog!”

What do you know!  In the other group yesterday, we talked about this children’s song:

What do you know about the feelings in that song?

What do you know! There’s a comment section below where you can post what you know.

What do you know!  I’m ending another post with gratitude to all, including you.

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What do you know!  We all make a difference.

Categories: definition, group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , | 24 Comments

Day 1798: Value

If you value blog posts about values, you might value this, this, and/or this.

If you value my photos, here’s the first one I took yesterday:

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If you value definitions, here’s one:

val·ue
ˈvalyo͞o
noun
1.  the regard that something is held to deserve; the importance, worth, or usefulness of something.
“your support is of great value”
synonyms: worth, usefulness, advantage, benefit, gain, profit, good, help, merit, helpfulness, avail
2. a person’s principles or standards of behavior; one’s judgment of what is important in life.
“they internalize their parents’ rules and values”
synonyms: principles, ethics, moral code, morals, standards, code of behavior
“society’s values are passed on to us as children”
verb
1. estimate the monetary worth of (something).
“his estate was valued at $45,000”
synonyms: evaluate, assess, estimate, appraise, price, put/set a price on
“his estate was valued at $345,000”
2. consider (someone or something) to be important or beneficial; have a high opinion of.
“she had come to value her privacy and independence”
synonyms: think highly of, have a high opinion of, hold in high regard, rate highly, esteem, set (great) store by, put stock in, appreciate, respect

 

Is there anything you particularly value about that definition?  I notice the very different values of the estates in those examples. I do not value people based on the size of their estates. Do you?

Now that the tax bill has passed both chambers of the U.S. Congress, it’s clear that their values are very different from mine.

Do you see value in my other photos from yesterday?

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I have sustainable love for this valuable song from Newsies, which cheered me up yesterday.

Finally, here’s a quote I value from that definition of value, above:

“your support is of great value”

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Day 1795: Entitled

I think we’re all entitled to a definition of today’s title.

en·ti·tled
inˈtīdld,enˈtīdld
adjective
believing oneself to be inherently deserving of privileges or special treatment.

Yesterday, when I entered the group room, followed by the group members, an entitled person kept talking on the phone despite my  multiple requests that he vacate the room so I could start my patient group.

One group member who witnessed this wondered whether the young doctor  felt entitled to finish his  phone call because medical systems have a hierarchy.   I felt entitled to express my opinion that in any medical hierarchy, the patients should be on the top.

We are all entitled to our opinions.

I’m wondering if my photos from yesterday relate to today’s title of “Entitled.” In any case, I’m entitled to share them.

If we realize we are acting in an entitled way, we can always try again with more empathy and compassion.

Here’s “Entitled” by Leighton Meester:

I hope you know you are entitled to make a comment, below.

Everyone who helped me create this “Entitled” post is entitled to my sincere gratitude and so are you!

Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

Day 1781: Eye roll

I am going to start with a definition of “eye roll” because that’s how I roll.

The action of rolling one’s eyes, typically as an expression of exasperation, disbelief, or disapproval.

Yesterday, when somebody at work treated me like I was his secretary, I did an eye roll in the privacy of my office.  While my eyes were rolling, I composed an email in my head that said

I am not your secretary! I am not even your assigned social worker!  I don’t like this!

but I didn’t send it.  Instead, I sent him an email in which I responded to his request and instructed him how to interact with social work more effectively in the future.

What makes your eyes roll?  Any of these photos?

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Please roll your eyes over this YouTube video combining “Narrow Your Eyes” by They Might Be Giants with cartoon ponies.

Feel free to roll your eyes down to the end of this post to leave a comment.

I thank all  who helped me roll out yet another eye-rolling blog post  and — of course! — you, for rolling your eyes here, today.

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 30 Comments

Day 1767: Unlawful

What does “unlawful” mean to you?

Here‘s what it means to Merriam-Webster:

Definition of unlawful

1 :not lawful :illegal
2 :not morally right or conventional
— unlawfully \ˌən-ˈlȯ-f(ə-)lē\ adverb
— unlawfulness  \ˌən-ˈlȯ-fəl-nəs\ noun

First Known Use: 14th century

So now we know that unlawful means “not lawful.” Is that helpful or not helpful?

Also, is morally right really equivalent to conventional? Personally, I strive to be morally right but rarely strive to be conventional.

I also wonder what “unlawful” meant in the 14th century and how the meaning has changed over time.

These days, when I read the news (which is still lawful, as far as I know), I see many stories about people in power being unlawful, which is awful (“unlawful” minus the first three letters).

Is this photo unlawful, lawful, or awful?

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What about this one?

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“MKM” are the initials of my boyfriend Michael.  If I had written that on a wall, would that have been unlawful? How about taking a picture of it, like I did yesterday?

Here‘s Unlawful singing “You’re Not Alone.”*

I’m glad it’s not unlawful to sing or say “You’re Not Alone,” because that’s a very important message of group therapy (which I practice lawfully in Boston).

Here and now, it’s not unlawful to

  • blog,
  • leave comments, and
  • express gratitude to all who helped me create this”unlawful” post and to you — of course! — for lawfully reading it.

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* Perhaps it was unlawful to use that video of Unlawful, because sinceI published this post,  that video has disappeared.

Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 29 Comments

Day 1742: Privilege

I have the privilege, today, to present a definition of the word “privilege.”

priv·i·lege
ˈpriv(ə)lij
noun
1. a special right, advantage, or immunity granted or available only to a particular person or group of people.
“education is a right, not a privilege”
synonyms: advantage, benefit

I have the privilege and the right to make these two points:

  1. The example in that definition evokes  my post from yesterday and
  2.  Privilege” is the only word of all the many words whose definitions  I’ve presented over the years in this blog  that has had only ONE definition.

Is that an advantage or a benefit, having only one definition?  Does that make things simpler and clearer?  With all the discourse over “privilege,” I expected more definitions.

What’s your definition of  “privilege”?

Dr. Vivienne Ming talks about a certain kind of privilege here:

 

Yesterday, I had the privilege of attending a 50th wedding anniversary celebration with people I feel privileged to know.

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Happy 50th anniversary, Diane and John!

I also have the privilege of living in a beautiful location.

 

It would be a privilege to read any comments you might leave, below.

It’s a privilege to blog every day for you all and for that, I’m grateful.

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , | 27 Comments

Day 1714: Second guessing

Let’s take a second to look at second guessing.

Second guessing is when we doubt a decision we’ve made, assuming we should have chosen differently.

I’m going to second guess my personal definition and see what the internet says about “second guessing.”

sec·ond-guess
verb
gerund or present participle: second-guessing
1. anticipate or predict (someone’s actions or thoughts) by guesswork.
“he had to second-guess what the environmental regulations would be in five years’ time”
2. NORTH AMERICAN
judge or criticize (someone) with hindsight.
“the prime minister was willing to second-guess senior ministers in public”

I never would have guessed that my definition would show up second there. My second surprise  about that online definition is that only North Americans second guess the way I do.  I’m also second guessing my assumptions about second guessing because  I didn’t know you could second guess what somebody else does or says. Every time I second guess, I second guess myself.

Let’s stay with my definition of second guessing for the remaining seconds of today’s post. Second guessing, I’m guessing, is not helpful.  When you judge or criticize yourself with hindsight, you are ignoring that you did your best at the time when you made your original decision. Here’s a second way of saying that: Hindsight is 20-20.  Hindsight and second guessing have perfect vision because you can include the results of your decision in your analysis of its effectiveness.  When you were deciding originally, you didn’t know the outcome of your decision. In order to make perfect first guesses, we’d all need to be psychic.

Does anybody want to guess why I’m writing about second guessing today?

I’m now second guessing asking that question because how could you possibly guess the answer?  You’d have to be psychic. I’m third guessing asking that question because I don’t think my answer will be particularly illuminating or useful.

I guess I just want people to know that I think second guessing gets in the way of looking at the pros and cons of our first guessing and then moving on to a more effective next guess.

I’ve stopped second guessing the photos I take. Let’s take a second to look at the first, second, and third picture I snapped yesterday.

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Who am I to second guess the quality of my decisions when I’m doing the best I can? And who put that laundry detergent so far out of my reach? I’m guessing it was Michael.

Here‘s some second guessing from Jonny Lang:

I guess I’ll find out what’s going on with Irma, the second incredibly destructive storm on course to strike North America this hurricane season.  I don’t understand people who second guess what professional scientists say about climate change.

I’m not going to second guess my decision to end these posts with thanks to all who help me create them and — second but not least — to YOU.

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

Day 1645: Empathy

Empathy appears in

EMPATHY

  1.  the imaginative projection of a subjective state into an object so that the object appears to be infused with it.
  2.  the action of understanding, being aware of, being sensitive to, and vicariously experiencing the feelings, thoughts, and experience of another of either the past or present without having the feelings, thoughts, and experience fully communicated in an objectively explicit manner; also, the capacity for this.
  • the actions of people I love, and
  • a license plate from New Hampshire.

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Empathy appears in all those places, but not very much in the news lately.  Is it non-empathic of me to believe that most people in the news don’t seem to have the capacity for it?

Are any of my other photos from yesterday infused with empathy?

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If I were the Queen of Amazing Empathy, I wouldn’t have eaten all those mussels last night.

Alanis Morissette might be the Queen of Amazing Empathy.

I believe that gratitude is part of empathy, so thanks to all who contributed to today’s blog and — of course! — to you, for your empathy.

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 28 Comments

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