Posts Tagged With: gratitude

Day 2784: The truth

The truth

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The truth is that I continue to go on walks with my husband and my son, wearing masks and maintaining social distancing.

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The truth is that our wonderful kitty Oscar is not going to get any better as he spends his final precious days with us.

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The truth is that there are heroes everywhere.

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The truth is that one of my heroes is my husband Michael, who prepares wonderful meals for us.

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The truth is that I also took these photos yesterday:

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The truth is that reminds me of this 11-year-old video of my son Aaron and our cat Oscar:

The truth is that

  • Oscar is a very chill and accepting cat,
  •  I would like to be more like Oscar, and
  • I am very grateful for all who are reading this, including YOU.

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Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Day 2783: Does worry help?

“Does worry help?” is a question I have asked many, many (and don’t worry how many) people, over the years.

What’s your first guess, best guess about the answer?

Don’t worry, I’ll tell you answer. It’s a resounding NO.

Yesterday, people discussed the difference between worry and planning AND the difference between worry and caring.

Despite our confusion about those concepts, it is very possible to plan without worry and to care without worry, although separating those out takes work.

Does it help to worry about Oscar during his last days?

No, but it helps to plan and to care.

Does it help to worry about any of my photos here today?

Does it help to worry about procrastination or instant gratification? Coincidentally, last night my son and my husband were discussing the benefits of procrastination. Aaron said that procrastination involves getting a lot of other things done while you’re procrastinating. Also, procrastination makes you work efficiently, because you’re doing things quickly at the last minute.

Am I worried about my son? No.

Does worry help as I look for a dance number from Top Hat, which Oscar and I watched yesterday?

Does it help to worry about the weather? Not according to Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire.

Does gratitude help? Always.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 2776: No longer

I am no longer President of the Northeastern Society for Group Psychotherapy, so I am no longer worrying about acting Presidential (although “acting Presidential” no longer has the same meaning it used to).

Carl Reiner is no longer on this earth.

This sentence, at the end of the Wikepedia entry about Carl Reiner, is no longer than 20 words:

Reiner died at his home on June 29, 2020, aged 98, in the company of his family.

This episode of The Dick Van Dyke Show, which Carl Reiner wrote, produced, and created, is no longer than 25 minutes:

This 2000-Year-Old Man Routine, co-created by the no-longer-with-us Carl Reiner and the-still-with-us-as-of-this-writing Mel Brooks, is no longer than four minutes:

I am no longer able to say that I never saw that before. It’s been no longer than 55 years that I’ve known Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks as comic geniuses.

Mel Brooks, who describes himself on Twitter as “Writer, Director, Actor, Producer and Failed Dairy Farmer” and who no longer can have dinner every night  with his old friend and co-writer Carl Reiner, posted this no-longer-than-280-character tribute yesterday:

Carl was a giant, unmatched in his contributions to entertainment. He created comedy gems like The Dick Van Dyke Show, The Jerk, and Where’s Poppa? I met him in 1950 when he joined Sid Caesar on Your Show of Shows, and we’ve been best friends ever since. I loved him. When we were doing The 2000 Year Old Man together there was no better straight man in the world. So whether he wrote or performed or was just your best friend — nobody could do it better.  He’ll be greatly missed. A tired cliché in times like this, but in Carl Reiner’s case it’s absolutely true. He will be greatly missed.

It took me no longer than a few seconds to find this great photo of Carl Reiner, Annie Reiner, and Mel Brooks that was taken no longer than two days away from Mel Brooks’s 94th birthday and Carl Reiner’s death day:

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I hope it is no longer debatable in this country that black lives matter.

I am no longer worried about other people’s incorrect assumptions or my inadvertent miscommunications, like Mel Brooks’s birthday and Carl Reiner’s death day being the same day (which they aren’t — they are one day apart).

This post is no longer focusing on words as I share my images from yesterday:

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I am no longer expecting comments but I will welcome any you choose to make.

It takes no longer than one word to express heart-felt gratitude.

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Categories: in memoriam, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 23 Comments

Day 2775: Closure

Because today is my last day as President of the Northeastern Society for Group Psychotherapy, I am thinking about closure.

As I wrote in another blog post about closure,

Closure is important, in order to move on.

There is no right or wrong way to do closure.

Closure is challenging, because it brings up old closures, which often relate to losses.

I like to use the term “ending the chapter”, when I talk to people about closure. Somebody, in my office, recently said that in their culture, they use the term “putting the period on the end of the sentence.” I like that, too.

Here’s what I’ve written, so far, about closure in my final letter from the President:

As I’ve thought about writing this, my final letter to you as President of NSGP, naturally my mind has gone to thoughts of closure. (Personally, I don’t like the word “termination”, because that sounds SO final.) As I have learned from my trainings at NSGP (and as I often tell people in my “Coping and Healing” drop-in groups) a good-enough sense of closure is critical in transitions — allowing us to appreciate what we’ve shared together and to move ahead better equipped for future challenges.

In my groups, we often discuss the insufficient and disappointing closures with family members, friends, work situations, organizations, and other important aspects of our life, and how this lack of satisfying closure in important transitions can keep us stuck. During these challenging days, when we might be feeling uncomfortably stuck, closure is especially important.

So what helps with closure? Saying what feels left unsaid.

Naming what you got.

Naming what you didn’t get.

Discarding what is not serving you well.

Later today, I will facilitate a “Coping and Healing” group on a telehealth platform (which I sometimes call “The Home Version of Coping and Healing”). At the end of the group, the participants will hear me, as usual, acknowledge the importance of  getting closure in the “wrap up” section of the group. I will introduce wrap-up by explaining, again, what helps with closure. I will invite discarding “what is not serving you well” by showing this to the group:

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That’s the magic waste paper basket, an important part of my Coping and Healing groups. If you throw something away in the magic waste paper basket, it will either go away or  come back less powerful.  Here’s an incomplete list of what people have thrown away in the magic waste paper basket:

  • self-judgment,
  • self-doubt,
  • difficult people,
  • unhealthy behaviors,
  • negative self-talk,
  • worry,
  • cognitive distortions,
  • pain, and
  • paper.

Do you see closure in these other images?

 

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We’re working on getting  humane closure with our 18-year-old cat, Oscar, who has cancer.

Here‘s “Closure” by Hayley Warner

… and “Closure” by Opeth:

I’ll get closer to closure by quoting this comment from YouTube about Opeth’s “Closure”:

Alex Mercer
1 year ago
The abrupt ending pisses me off. I need closure!!

Alex Mercer needs closure. Do you?

Gratitude helps me get closure, every day.

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Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 24 Comments

Day 2773: Your participation is requested

Your participation is requested, as stated here:

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Your participation is requested in this blog post, as I share these photos from yesterday.

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How do you tend to participate?  Do you participate more when your participation is requested?

Your participation is requested in answering this question:

When I was participating in the flow of love yesterday by taking one of the photos above, somebody came out of  their house and asked, “Can I help you?”  When I said, “I’m taking a picture of this because I thought it was funny,” she nodded, went back in her house while saying, ‘We are big skiers.”  Which photo was it?

 

When I search YouTube for “your participation is requested” I find this:

Your participation is requested in appreciation and gratitude!

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Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments

Day 2772: The light

As I’ve said to several people lately, “I think I can see the light at the end of the tunnel. I just hope it’s not a train coming in the opposite direction.”

Can you see the light in my photos from yesterday?

Here‘s “I Saw the Light” by Todd Rundgren:

I look forward to seeing the light in the comments section, below.

There’s always the light of gratitude at the end of these posts (and I don’t think it’s a train coming in the other direction!).

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 2771: Farewell for now

The amazing blogger beth made this hopeful, beautiful, helpful, and caring comment about my post from yesterday:

… hope that the memorial for your friend was beautiful and helped all of you who cared for her to say farewell for now.

That hope was realized, as I hope  you can see in these photos from yesterday:

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Those Ruth Bader Ginsberg socks were worn by Lisa, one of my co-workers. Until we were saying farewell for now to Eleanor, Lisa and I didn’t know we were connected by our love for her.

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That’s my old friend Andy, who I’ve known almost as long as I’ve known Eleanor.  We were reunited yesterday as we said farewell for now to her.

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I was so happy to finally meet Eleanor’s children, Gabe and Rosa, after hearing so many wonderful things about them.  As we said farewell for now to their mother, I could  see Eleanor’s beautiful legacy in them.

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Eleanor’s husband Ira and I spoke about how difficult it was to say farewell for now to Eleanor because she was soooo cool. We love her so much that we have trouble believing she’s gone from this world. We also know that she lives on in many, many loving hearts.

When I say farewell for now to somebody I love, everything reminds me of them.

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I love you, Eleanor.

Here‘s Farewell … For Now by Georges Delerue:

 

Thanks to all who are helping me say farewell for now to my long-time and beloved friend Eleanor, including YOU.

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Categories: in memoriam, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 2770: _________ People

Hello, people!

The news today is full of __________ people.  How would you fill in the blank?

Today’s Daily Bitch Calendar refers to BEAUTIFUL people.

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Here’s a quote from Chief Red Eagle about ANGRY people and LOVING people:

Angry people want you to see how powerful they are. Loving people want you to see how powerful you are.

I will be seeing LOVING people today at an outdoor memorial gathering for my beloved friend, Eleanor.

__________ people take photos like these:

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Now I’m thinking about APPRECIATIVE people and SOULFUL people.

Ranker.com has a list of The Best Songs About People, Here and now, I’m choosing Curtis Mayfield‘s “We The People Who Are Darker Than Blue.”

GRATEFUL people end their blog posts like this.

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Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 31 Comments

Day 2769: Big hikes

Today’s Daily Bitch Calendar relates to big hikes:

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I am hearing from many people, through my Coping and Healing groups, that food choices and walks are very important these days.

Here are some photos from yesterday’s big hike:

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Thanks to Michael for that big meal (with monkfish, vegetables, and noodles) after my big hike.

It was hot here yesterday, so here‘s “Heat of the Day” by Pat Metheny and Lyle Mays:

 

No matter where I’m hiking, I’m always feeling big gratitude:

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Categories: group therapy, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 2768: Smiles

I wonder how many smiles appear when the latest post of The Year(s) of Living Non-Judgmentally shows up (even when it’s late, like today)?

In a Coping and Healing telehealth group today, the mindfulness exercise was focusing on smiles. We talked about how even a fake smile can get endorphins going and improve somebody’s mood.

Smiles are particularly difficult to come by these days because of

  • tension,
  • stress,
  • worry,
  • fear,
  • uncertainty,
  • discomfort,
  • loss, and
  • masks.

How many smiles can you find in these recent photos?

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You may need to click on some of those smaller photos to look for smiles, but smiles are always worth looking for.

Here‘s a song about smiles:

I’ll smile if you leave a comment and I hope gratitude makes you smile.

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Categories: group therapy, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

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