personal growth

Day 1881: So much to love about —

There’s so much to love about my co-worker Juli, who offered me this Rice Krispies treat yesterday.

IMG_7144

So much to love about —

  • Rice Krispies treats,
  • Generous people,
  • The world,

IMG_7151

  • Bunnies,

IMG_7152

IMG_7141

 

IMG_7142

IMG_7145

  • Dogs,

IMG_0007

IMG_0006

  • Life,
  • Stories,

IMG_7146

  • Writing,
  • Singing,
  • Balloons,

IMG_7149

  • Birthdays,
  • My son Aaron, who turned 20 yesterday,
  • Memories of past birthdays,

Young Aaron

  • Comments on this blog,
  • Everyone who helped me create today’s post,
  • You, and
  • Thanks!

IMG_7143

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Day 1880: What makes this a safe place?

What makes this a safe place?  What makes any place safe?

I ask those questions because without a safe place, it’s difficult to be in the moment, trust, learn, and grow.

Yesterday, in a therapy group, the members discussed many issues, including safe places.

IMG_7130

Then people expressed thoughts and feelings about personal safe places.

IMG_7128

IMG_7129

 

IMG_7126

IMG_7127IMG_7125

In the safe place of the group room, I asked myself those two questions  — What makes this a safe place?  How can I express that in 20 minutes? — because I’ll be presenting about my groups next week in the safe place of a group therapy conference in Houston.

I hope this is a safe place for you to describe what makes a place safe for you.

In the news, people are discussing whether guns make a place safe.

Parents and children are challenging politicians to make the United States a safer place.

Gratitude helps make this a safe place, so many thanks to all who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — to YOU.

IMG_6902

 

 

 

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 1879: Do it right!

Yesterday, when I was doing it right with Physical Therapy for my torn rotator cuff,  I  right away noticed this ….

IMG_7111

…. which was right on the top of this.

IMG_7110

Do it right and prevent fractures, injuries, and other problems in your everyday activities.

Is that too much pressure, to be told to do it right?  Is telling somebody to do it right the right way to promote acceptance and peace, especially if different people have different opinions about what’s right and how to do it right?

My opinion is that these high school students were doing it right yesterday when they were taking it to the streets, chanting “Gun Control!” and “NRA is not okay!”

IMG_7120

The New England weather wasn’t doing winter right yesterday with record high temperatures, but that was all right with me.

Did I do it right with these other photographs?

IMG_7109

IMG_7112

IMG_7108

 

IMG_7119

IMG_7117

IMG_7113

Somebody did not do it right in that last photo.

After I do something, I wonder, “Did I do it right?”  I do it right by telling myself I did it well enough and then think about how I could do it better the next time.

The Doobie Brothers do it right.

Michael McDonald  and music students do it right at Berklee College of Music‘s 2011 commencement.

Do I do it right when I ask for feedback?

IMG_7114

Do-it-right thanks to all who help me do this daily blog and to those who do it right by reading it (including YOU).

IMG_7025

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Day 1878: What does P.T. stand for?

P.T. stands for Physical Therapy for Partially Torn rotator cuffs, like mine.

P.T. also stands for the Painkiller Tramadol, Perhaps Taken Prior to Therapy Proceeding Today.

What else does P.T. stand for?

Photos Taken!

Psychotherapy Themes, Projected Thusly:

IMG_7084

Positive Therapy:

IMG_7091

IMG_7092

IMG_7094

Podiatric Therapy:

IMG_7079

Posted Tips:

IMG_7082

IMG_7083

Perfectionism Tempered:

IMG_7093

Panoramic Tableau:

IMG_7075

Prepared Treats for Pescatarian Tastes:

IMG_7076

IMG_7095

P.T. also stands for President Trump and Piano Tickler Paul Tobey Playing This Peanuts Theme.

Personal Thoughts?  Please Transcribe.

Passionate Thanks to Paul Tobey and Primarily To People Taking Precious Time to Perceptively Try this P.T. Post Today (including YOU).

IMG_6645

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments

Day 1877: Save a life

Yesterday, when I was saving my own life by taking a healing walk near the ocean, I noticed this sign:

IMG_7074

I saved that photo because I think we need to save ourselves and each other,  one life at a time.

I’ve saved this saying in my heart:

Whoever saves one life, saves the world entire.

 

I will do my best to save a life today by

  • driving carefully,
  • doing my work,
  • taking care of myself,
  • taking care of others, and
  • contributing to save-a-life causes like Everytown for Gun Safety.

How might you save a life today?

Many thanks to all who care about saving lives and — of course!  — to YOU.

IMG_7025

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , | 25 Comments

Day 1876: How man learned

Yesterday, I saw a greeting card with a caption about how man learned.

IMG_7066.JPG

I thought it showed how man learned to golf, but it showed how man learned to do something else.

IMG_7065

How Ann learned to blog includes noticing messages from the universe and riffing on them. I’m now imagining future documentation of how man learned to

  • accept others,
  • prevent bloodshed,
  • let go of fear,
  • recognize and reframe cognitive distortions,
  • love,
  • heal,
  • speak up,
  • tell the truth, and
  • do the right thing.

I learned a long time ago how to take photos and trust they would work in the next day’s post.

IMG_7038

IMG_7039

IMG_7042

IMG_7040

IMG_7070

IMG_7041.JPG

IMG_7064

IMG_7068

IMG_7067

IMG_7071

How my man Michael learned to cook is a long story, but I’m glad he did.

How man learns to play the piano, by Jon Batiste:

How Ann learned to thank everybody who helped create today’s post and — of course! — YOU:

IMG_7037

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 1875: Tipping Point

At this point in my posts, I often define my terms.

tip·ping point

noun
the point at which a series of small changes or incidents becomes significant enough to cause a larger, more important change.

We might argue that the history of gun violence in the United States is not a series of small changes or incidents. Nevertheless, I still believe we may be at a tipping point of a large, important change because of people like Emma Gonzalez, a  senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, who survived the mass shooting on Wednesday.

I hope Emma Gonzalez — who makes many passionate points — and the United States will heal together.  And I hope we’re finally at a tipping point of saner gun laws.

I think about other tipping points in the United States, including Joseph Welch confronting Senator Joseph McCarthy on June 9, 1954:

Here’s the introductory description from that YouTube video.

Wisconsin Republican Senator Joseph R. McCarthy rocketed to public attention in 1950 with his allegations that hundreds of Communists had infiltrated the State Department and other federal agencies. These charges struck a particularly responsive note at a time of deepening national anxiety about the spread of world communism.

McCarthy relentlessly continued his anticommunist campaign into 1953, when he gained a new platform as chairman of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. He quickly put his imprint on that subcommittee, shifting its focus from investigating fraud and waste in the executive branch to hunting for Communists. He conducted scores of hearings, calling hundreds of witnesses in both public and closed sessions.

A dispute over his hiring of staff without consulting other committee members prompted the panel’s three Democrats to resign in mid 1953. Republican senators also stopped attending, in part because so many of the hearings were called on short notice or held away from the nation’s capital. As a result, McCarthy and his chief counsel Roy Cohn largely ran the show by themselves, relentlessly grilling and insulting witnesses. Harvard law dean Ervin Griswold described McCarthy’s role as “judge, jury, prosecutor, castigator, and press agent, all in one.”

In the spring of 1954, McCarthy picked a fight with the U.S. Army, charging lax security at a top-secret army facility. The army responded that the senator had sought preferential treatment for a recently drafted subcommittee aide. Amidst this controversy, McCarthy temporarily stepped down as chairman for the duration of the three-month nationally televised spectacle known to history as the Army-McCarthy hearings.

The army hired Boston lawyer Joseph Welch to make its case. At a session on June 9, 1954, McCarthy charged that one of Welch’s attorneys had ties to a Communist organization. As an amazed television audience looked on, Welch responded with the immortal lines that ultimately ended McCarthy’s career: “Until this moment, Senator, I think I never really gauged your cruelty or your recklessness.” When McCarthy tried to continue his attack, Welch angrily interrupted, “Let us not assassinate this lad further, senator. You have done enough. Have you no sense of decency?”

Overnight, McCarthy’s immense national popularity evaporated. Censured by his Senate colleagues, ostracized by his party, and ignored by the press, McCarthy died three years later, 48 years old and a broken man.

Sometimes, one person giving voice to shared outrage can tip a nation towards progress.

Let’s see if my one photo from yesterday supports tipping points.

IMG_7030

The United States has needed Joseph Welch and Emma Gonzalez, whom I love.

Thanks to all who have contributed to history’s positive tipping points and — of course! —  to you (especially if you make points in the comments section, below).

IMG_6408

Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 29 Comments

Day 1874: The Year of the Dog

Three hundred and sixty-nine days ago (but who’s counting?),  I wrote Day 1505: The Year of the ______.  In that post, I hoped that 2017 would be, among other things, The Year of the Water View.

IMG_5855

And it was!  That water view helped me deal with many things in 2017, which was The Year of the Cock/Rooster/Bird.

Yesterday, in honor of the first day of The Year of the Dog, I did a special mindfulness exercise in my therapy group. I asked people to focus on images and memories of dogs.  Even though I’m a cat person, I found that mindfulness exercise very helpful, relaxing, and soothing.

Vivian, the Social Work intern who helps me facilitate that group, texted me this photo afterwards:

IMG_0018

I texted back “Oooh!  It’s the year of that!”

I plan to practice mindfulness and look at  more great photos this year, because 2018 is  going to be

  • The Year of the Shoulder Pain and
  • The Second Year of the Trump Administration.

I doggedly hope The Year of the Dog is also

  • The Year of Personal Power.

IMG_7022

  • The Year of Dignity.

IMG_6947

  • The Year of Beating Heart Disease.

IMG_7023

IMG_6959

  • The Year of Love.

IMG_6969

IMG_6990

  • The Year of the Changes for the Better.

As is every year here at The Year(s) of Living Non-Judgmentally,  it’s The Year of the Thanks.

IMG_7027

 

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Day 1873: Two words

Another post!

Fantastic joke:

A man wanted to become a monk so he went to the monastery and talked to the head monk.

The head monk said, “You must take a vow of silence and can only say two words every three years.”

The man agreed and after the first 3 years, the head monk came to him and said, “What are your two words?”

“Food cold!” the man replied.

Three more years went by and the head monk came to him and said “What are your two words?”

“Robe dirty!” the man exclaimed.

Three more years went by and the head monk came to him and said, “What are your two words?”

“I quit!” said the man.

“Well,” the head monk replied, “I am not surprised. You have done nothing but complain ever since you got here!”

Don Lemon:

Don Lemon has two words for people who say it’s not the time to talk about gun violence in America: “Shut up.”

After Wednesday’s mass shooting at a South Florida high school, the “CNN Tonight” host said that compared to other countries, America was “off the charts” when it came to this kind of violence. And that meant we have to talk about guns.

“You can save it. People who are saying, ‘Oh, y’know, it’s not the time to talk about guns’ or whatever,” Lemon said in a clip posted online by Raw Story. “Yes, it is. Shut up. I don’t want to hear it. It absolutely is.”

Lemon said the one thing that sets America apart was its easy access to guns, including people who shouldn’t be allowed to have firearms:

“So don’t tell me that it’s not time to talk about it. You talk to those people down in Florida who lost their loved ones. They’ll tell you it’s time to talk about it. ‘My loved one would be here if this shooter did not have access to an assault-style rifle.’”

New photos!

One shoe.

IMG_7015

Lost scarf.

IMG_7018

More bananas.

IMG_7016

Yogi Tea.

IMG_7014

Great book.

IMG_7013

Hope quote.

IMG_7012

Emily Dickinson!

“Hope” is the thing with feathers – (314)

BY EMILY DICKINSON

“Hope” is the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all –

And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard –
And sore must be the storm –
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm –

I’ve heard it in the chillest land –
And on the strangest Sea –
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.

Two songs.

 

Any comments?

Thank you!

IMG_6784

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 23 Comments

Day 1872: Silver Linings

Yesterday, in a therapy group, we talked about silver linings, which are

the hopeful side of a situation that might seem gloomy on the surface. The common expression “every cloud has a silver lining” means that even the worst events or situations have some positive aspect.

The silver linings we talked about in group included the dark clouds of traumatic events which had made people stronger, more resilient, and grateful for the gifts of the present.

I found my own silver linings in that group:  I couldn’t write important themes up on the white board because of my torn rotator cuff so one of the group participants  wrote those lines instead, which meant

  • more group engagement and
  • better hand-writing.

IMG_7001

I was so pleased with these silver linings that I said,”Now I’m glad I hurt my arm.”  At first the group said, in unison, “No you’re not!” but that led to more valuable discussions about silver linings.

I want to underline this about silver linings:  I’m a person who can find a silver lining in my own painful injuries, but I can NOT find  silver linings in another horrific assault-weapon massacre in the U.S.  Maybe I can’t find silver linings there because nothing seems to disperse or lessen the  cloud of gun violence in the United States.

When my only child decided to go to the University of Edinburgh I easily found this silver lining:  no school shootings in Scotland.

What are your thoughts and feelings about silver linings?  Can you find any silver linings in my other photos?

 

IMG_6998IMG_7002

 

IMG_6996

IMG_6994

IMG_6995

I have a silver lining of hope that people will change their thoughts and change the world .

There’s  a “Silver Lining” by Rilo Kiley on YouTube.

 

Here’s my silver lining of gratitude for all who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — for YOU.

IMG_6948

Categories: group psychotherapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.