Posts Tagged With: Trump

Day 2996: Who is taking up too much space in your brain?

I don’t know about you, but annoying, obnoxious, miserable, angry, and unsafe people take up too much space in my brain.

My brain tells me that it needs to focus on these people, because they are threats to our well being.

I am telling my brain that we also need to focus on more pleasant, restful, and helpful things, in order to take care of ourselves and to conserve our energy.

I hope my latest images don’t take up too much space in your brain.

Here’s what I find when I search you tube for “Who is taking up too much space in your brain?”

Please make space in your brain for that important message: we can’t control thoughts and feelings, but we can control our actions.

Who will be taking up space in the comments section, below?

Thanks to all who have helped me take up blog space for almost 3000 days in a row, including YOU.

Categories: blogging, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, therapy | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 2941: Comebacks

I always appreciate it when you come back to this blog, which today will start out with a definition of “comeback.”

come·back /ˈkəmˌbak/

noun
1. a return by a well-known person, especially an entertainer or sports player, to the activity in which they have formerly been successful.
“the heavyweight champion is set to make his comeback”
Similar: resurgence, recovery, return, rally, upturn, revival, rebound, fightback
2. INFORMAL
a quick reply to a critical remark.
“some of my best comebacks just go right over people’s heads”

I’m looking forward to tomorrow’s comeback of many well-known politicians to the activities in which they have formerly been successful. I’m also looking forward to the comeback of my country to the world stage.

Also, since I was very young, I’ve been known for my comebacks. Once, when a young man was telling me how wonderful he was and said, “You can call me God, for short,” I had this comeback: “Short for what — Godawful?”

Now it’s time to come back to my most recent images. Do you see any comebacks in them?

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Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire have had many comebacks, as you can see here:

I look forward to your comebacks in the comment section, below.

Thanks to all who come back to this blog, including YOU.

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, politics | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 2940: Complaining

For the last four years, I’ve been complaining about the U.S. President and the enablers of his outrageous behaviors.

I’m looking forward to not complaining about our President, very soon.

Do you see any complaining in my latest images?

I actually did a little complaining to Michael about last night’s dinner, because (1) it was the second sandwich in a row and (2) it wasn’t pasta. As I said in my tweet above, I’m looking forward to more of that kind of complaining.

I’m not complaining about finding this video about complaining on YouTube:

I am complaining about my sleep pattern lately: I wake up way too early and have trouble falling back asleep. I’m hoping I’ll be doing less complaining about my sleep after the inauguration on Wednesday.

James Taylor is complaining in “Angry Blues.”

I won’t be complaining if you share some complaining in the comments section, below.

I’m so grateful for all who tolerate my complaining, including YOU!

Categories: insomnia, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

Day 2932: What’s the scariest animal?

Yesterday, I watched Stephen Colbert ask Tom Hanks, Meryl Streep, and George Clooney the same set of interesting questions including “What’s the scariest animal?”

At first, I was thinking that the scariest animal would be a crocodile or a bear. Later that night, I realized that, to me, the scariest animal was something else.

Man.

What’s the scariest animal in my images for today?

Yep. For me, the scariest animal is man.

When I search YouTube for “What’s the scariest animal?” I find “10 Terrifying Animals That Are Actually Friendly.”

What’s the scariest animal to you?

Thanks to all the animals who helped me create today’s blog post and thanks to all the animals who are reading it, including YOU.

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 30 Comments

Day 2931: Everything happens for a reason

Do you believe everything happens for a reason?

I find it more difficult to believe that everything happens for a reason when so many people seem to have lost their reason.

When so many people seem to have lost their reason, I look for a reason for why that has happened. That’s why I posted this question on Twitter yesterday:

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People’s responses happened for a reason and included the following:

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Those answers may have happened for a reason, but I still can’t find the reasons why so many people are still Trump supporters after all the unreasonable — and dangerous — things he has done and said.

Have these photos and other images happened for a reason?

There’s a reason why I captured that last image — I plan to use the “Thank you!” to end this post.

Here is “Everything Happens for a Reason” by Zhané:

It happens that I have so many reasons to be grateful, so thanks to all who help me create this daily blog, including you!

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, politics, psychology | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 28 Comments

Day 2929: When the bottom drops out

Yesterday morning, before the bottom dropped out at the USA Capitol Building in Washington, people in my Coping and Healing group discussed experiences of when the bottom drops out, including how that feels and how to cope. By sharing those experiences of when the bottom drops out and realizing they were not alone, the group members lifted each other up. I suggested that when the bottom drops out again they look down, feel their feet securely on the floor, and realize that the bottom is still there, even if it feels like it has dropped out.

According to an online definition, the bottom drops out “alludes to collapsing deeper than the very lowest point, or bottom.”

Yesterday afternoon, the current inhabitant of the White House collapsed deeper than his previous lowest point/bottom, inciting his followers to violently disrupt the transfer of power in the country I love.

As the whole world watched in horror, the bottom dropped out in the USA yesterday. Those of us who are familiar with malignant narcissists like Trump know that the bottom will drop out even LOWER if he remains in office.

When the bottom drops out, I’m too upset to take many photos, so here are all my recent images from top to bottom:

What do you do when the bottom drops out? When the bottom drops out for me, I reach out for people I love and trust, I anchor myself in the present moment, and I tell myself, “It’s safer than it feels.”

Therefore, I’m going to post, again, the video I shared on this blog yesterday, before the bottom dropped out, of audience members at the Stephen Colbert Show lifting up the late, great U.S. congressman from Georgia, John Lewis, as he crowd-surfed above them.

It makes me cry, here and now, to see how far the bottom has dropped out of my country.

Here is Senator Amy Klobuchar speaking to Stephen Colbert last night about her experience of when the bottom dropped out yesterday:

Here‘s Stephen Colbert showing a lot of feeling in his live monologue last night after the bottom dropped out and before his interview with Senator Klobuchar:

And here‘s his interview with Republican Representative Adam Kinzinger about his experience of when the bottom dropped out.

If you have any thoughts or feelings about when the bottom drops out, please drop a comment, below.

Now that you’ve reached the bottom here, thanks — from the bottom of my heart — to all who help me drop a blog post every day, including you.

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 34 Comments

Day 2911: What are you addicted to?

“What are you addicted to?” is a question I asked at the dinner table last night, after reading a very interesting article online about people’s addiction to grievances.

I am addicted to understanding other people’s behaviors (that’s probably why I became a psychotherapist). The article about the addiction to grievances explains a lot about Trump’s increasingly concerning behaviors as well as the behaviors of many others.

For many years, I have noticed people’s addiction to grievances, humorously immortalized in the “airing of grievances” part of the “Festivus” Seinfeld episode.

The article, by James Kimmel, Jr., a lecturer in psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine, explains that focusing on grievances stimulates the brain like drugs do, resulting in the constant revisiting of grievances and a craving for revenge.

Here are two quotes from the article:

… it turns out that your brain on grievance looks a lot like your brain on drugs. In fact, brain imaging studies show that harboring a grievance (a perceived wrong or injustice, real or imagined) activates the same neural reward circuitry as narcotics.

Recent studies show that similarly, cues such as experiencing or being reminded of a perceived wrong or injustice — a grievance — activate these same reward and habit regions of the brain, triggering cravings in anticipation of experiencing pleasure and relief through retaliation. To be clear, the retaliation doesn’t need to be physically violent—an unkind word, or tweet, can also be very gratifying.

James Kimmel, Jr., POLITICO Magazine

Personally, I am actively trying to break any addiction to grievances by focusing on other — more adaptive — addictions, like blogging, walking, and taking photos for this blog.

I am also addicted to connections, synchronicity, and making meaning, so it occurs to me, here and now, that a brain addicted to grievances is a cold and dark place.

What are you addicted to? Have you ever been addicted to grievances? Do you know somebody who is addicted to grievances? I’m addicted to your comments, so please leave one, below.

Finally, I’m addicted to expressing gratitude, so thanks to all who help enable me in my addiction to blogging, including YOU!

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 2902: What are people thinking?

“What are people thinking?” is something I often ask in my Coping and Healing groups.

“What are people thinking?” is also something I am increasingly asking myself as I look at the news these days.

What are people thinking on Twitter recently?

What are people thinking about the photos I took yesterday?

When I search YouTube for “What are people thinking?” many of the videos focus on what rich people are thinking, which, to my way of thinking, explains a lot. Personally, I don’t care what rich people are thinking. I think people think about rich people way too much.

Here is “The Dangers of Thinking Too Much; And Thinking Too Little” (and what were people thinking punctuating that title like that?)

Here is what one person is thinking about that video:

I think that sometimes I may think too much about thinking too much.. I think.

What are people thinking about “Think” by Aretha Franklin?

What are people thinking about gratitude, here and now ?

Categories: 2020 U.S. Election, group therapy, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments

Day 2901: Good to know

One thousand, three hundred, and sixty days ago (it’s good to know who’s counting — me!), I wrote another post titled “Good to know.” It’s good to know that it’s still good to know things, even during these times of a deadly pandemic and deadly denial.

I hope it’s good to know that I finally got up some good courage yesterday to call the Internal Revenue Service to know about my good refund, which, as you might know, is a good many months late.

It’s good to know details, so here’s what happened:

  • I know how difficult it is to connect with a real person in the IRS, especially these days, so I set aside a good long time to make the call.
  • The automated IRS phone system gave me the same response I had gotten on-line a good many weeks ago — that the system had no knowledge of my refund — which was not good to know.
  • Other automated information increased my fear that something bad had happened to my refund.
  • I tried navigating the phone system every which way I knew, but still couldn’t get through to a real person with knowledge.
  • I googled “how to reach a real person at IRS” which gave me a complicated hack of the phone system including refusing to enter my social security number twice, which was very good to know.
  • I stayed on hold for 45 minutes, marveling that so many good people ahead of me had figured out the good-to-know hack of the phone system.
  • I finally spoke to a wonderful IRS employee who was home in Texas with her dogs and who was good to know. She told me the good-to-know information that there was a backlog of mailed returns and mine was among them. That was the only reason I had not received my refund, instead of all the bad-to-know fears my mind had manufactured.
  • She told me other good-to-know information, including (1) don’t mail in your return again, (2) don’t worry about identity thieves stealing your refund, (3) your husband’s erroneous Social Security information (which necessitated the mailing rather than the e-filing of our joint tax return) has been corrected, and (4) you go, girl, for marrying a good guy 10 years younger than you who cooks!

It’s good to know that bureaucracies can be made up of good-to-know human beings.

Are any of today’s images good to know?

It’s good to know Hanukkah is starting tonight and Michael will be making good potato latkes very soon.

Here are five good-to-know facts about Hanukkah from watchmojo.com:

Many thanks to all my good-to-know readers, including YOU.

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 23 Comments

Day 2886: Fairy Tales

When I was young, I read many fairy tales, including the ones in the Brown Fairy Tale Book, Green Fairy Tale Book, and the other colors of Fairy Tale Books illustrated by the amazing Arthur Rackham.

I wonder if that’s why I believe that life could be like a fairy tale with

  • heroes,
  • quests,
  • suffering,
  • surprises,
  • learning,
  • growth,
  • love,
  • rewards for kindness, and
  • the triumph of good over evil.

I especially remember the Grimm brothers’ tale of The Fisherman and His Wife (found here) which I have been quoting to Michael with increasing frequency over the past four years. This is a story of escalating greed, selfishness, hubris, overreach, narcissism, and ultimate retribution, where somebody wishes for more and more absurd amounts of wealth and power, until they get what they deserve.

Because of all the tales I read as a kid, I’ve believed that narcissism and greed, while perhaps succeeding spectacularly for a while, ultimately would not win.

And I was right. At least for now.

Do you see fairy tales in today’s images?

Here’s the tale of The Fisherman and his Wife.

Here’s a video showing the art of Arthur Rackham:

Today, I am happily ever after thanking all who help me concoct the tales in this daily blog, including YOU!

Categories: 2020 U.S. Presidential election, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

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