Posts Tagged With: Stephen King

Day 2596: Adults

In all the thousands of daily blog posts this adult has written over the past seven years, there’s been only one blog post with “adult” in the title. That was Day 1466: Adulting, posted ALMOST EXACTLY three years ago today (but which adults are counting … and why?).

Adults (according to this adult):

  • make mistakes,
  • admit they’ve made mistakes, and
  • learn from their mistakes.

Here’s what other adults have said about adults:

The value of marriage is not that adults produce children, but that children produce adults.  — Peter De Vries

Why did adults have to be so thick?  They always say, “tell the truth,” and when you do, they don’t believe you.  What’s the point? — Rick Riordan

“If you’re going to be a grown-up,” said Joan, “you’ve got to start thinking about grown-up things. And number one is money.” — Julian Barnes

Oh Christ, he groaned to himself, if this is the stuff adults have to think about I never want to grow up. — Stephen King

It’s only adults who read the top levels most of the time. I think children read the internal meanings of everything. — Maurice Sendak

Grown-ups never understand anything by themselves, and it is tiresome for children to be always and forever explaining things to them. — Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Some people discard their childhood like an old hat. They forget about it like a phone number that’s no longer valid. They used to be kids, then they became adults — but what are they now? Only those who grow up and continue to be children are humans. — Erich Kästner

Adults are just making things up as they go along. And when they’re scared, adults have no more answers than us kids. — Mike A. Lancaster

“You and I both know that love is for children,” he said. “We’re adults. Compatibility is for adults.”  “Compatibility is for my bluetooth and my car,” Teresa replied. “Only they get along just fine, and my car never makes my bluetooth feel like shit.” — Maggie Stiefvater

I bet if you look at the average teenager and the average adult, the average teenager has read more books in the past year than the average adult. Now of course the adult would be all like, “I’m busy, I got a job, I got stuff to do.”  WHATEVER!  READ! I mean, you’re watching CSI: Miami. Why would you be watching CSI: Miami when you could be READING CSI: Miami, the novelization? — John Green

Here are all the photos this adult took yesterday (when she could have been reading instead):

IMG_0633

IMG_0634

IMG_0635

IMG_0636

IMG_0637

IMG_0638

IMG_0642

fullsizeoutput_4092

fullsizeoutput_4098

fullsizeoutput_409e

fullsizeoutput_409f.jpeg

IMG_0645

Yesterday, I was looking forward to performing at an Open Mic, with my child (who is now an adult) in the audience.  One of my worst fears as an adult (based on an actual experience I had as a child) is to forget the words and chords when I’m in front of a audience. Last night, that worst fear came true …

… but I’m enough of an adult to be okay with it!

I’m looking forward to what adults have to say about today’s post.

I think gratitude is a very adult way to end this post, so thanks to all who help me blog every day, including YOU.

fullsizeoutput_4068

Categories: original song, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 431: Why yesterday’s post was so short

Yesterday’s post was shorter than my CBN — Current Blogging Norm.

I’ve written short posts before — like Day 28: Losing the investment in the outcome, Day 68: Barriers to Connection,  Day 85: You’ll figure it out,  and, especially, Day 95: A startlingly brief post (which is, essentially, one line: “We are neither as unimportant or as important as we fear.”) — but not for a while.

Why was yesterday’s post — What I learned at the group therapy conference” — so short? Confidentiality created safety there, so there wasn’t much I could write.  Also, before composing that post, I wrote an email where I took some risks, so I had less time and energy to spare.

Don’t get me wrong: I think brief posts are fine.  Many of the posts I learn from, in the Blog-o-sphere, are short and sweet. Like this, this, and this, which I read here on WordPress, this morning.

And there are many famous sayings about the advantages of brief communications:

“Brevity is the soul of wit.”
― William ShakespeareHamlet

Image

“I have only made this letter longer because I have not had the time to make it shorter.”
(Letter 16, 1657)”
― Blaise PascalThe Provincial Letters

Image

“It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book.”
― Friedrich Nietzsche

Image

“The secret of a good sermon is to have a good beginning and a good ending; and to have the two as close together as possible.”
― George Burns

Image

“Be sincere, Be brief, Be seated.”
― Franklin D. Roosevelt

Image

“Like all sweet dreams, it will be brief, but brevity makes sweetness, doesn’t it?”
― Stephen King11/22/63

Image

“Writing is 1 percent inspiration, and 99 percent elimination.”
― Louise Brooks

Image

“A novel is just a story that hasn’t yet discovered a way to be brief.”
― George Saunders

Image

(thanks to Goodread, for the quotes and the images)

Here’s the soul of irony: This post can NOT be brief, now that I’ve included so many quotes about brevity.

So what else do I want to write, before this becomes a novel? How can I make the beginning and the ending of this “sermon” as close as possible?

While it may be too late for the latter, here are some final thoughts, for today:

That email I sent yesterday was one where I took some risks. I:

  1. wrote to somebody I admire,
  2. was authentic, and
  3. asked for help.

For me, that might be the very definition of a risky email.  I haven’t heard back, as of this writing.  Now, I’m waiting, to see if I get a response.

If I don’t, am I still glad I sent the email?

Yes.

Look what I did, right there, dear readers.   I was sincere, brief, and seated.

Thanks to President Roosevelt, to the other admirable advocates of brevity in this post (including A Small Act of Kindness, lead.learn.live, and Find Your Middle Ground),  and to you, for reading today.

Categories: inspiration, personal growth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.