Posts Tagged With: speaking up

Day 1598: Silence sucks

There’s a new ad campaign in Boston: “Silence sucks.”

Do you think that silence sucks?  Always?  If not always, when?

I believe that silence sucks when there’s

  • injustice,
  • danger,
  • pain, or
  • the need for help.

Here are two examples of the “Silence Sucks” ad campaign:

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It sucks that I couldn’t get better photos of those yesterday. The tagline on those posters is:

When it comes to postpartum depression (PPD)

SILENCE SUCKS

I noticed “Silence Sucks” yesterday because

Here’s a video about postpartum depression that doesn’t suck.

It doesn’t suck that

  • my son is home for the summer,
  • I’m getting a 5-year award at work this morning,
  • I’m facilitating a therapy group after that, and
  • I’m seeing my therapist this afternoon.

You know what else wouldn’t suck?  A comment from you.

Non-silent thanks to all who helped me create this post and — of course! — to YOU.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , | 23 Comments

Day 1378: My best side

In this daily blog and elsewhere, I like to present my best side.  That is, I tend to focus on the positive and to share hopeful and optimistic thoughts and feelings.

Of course, each one of us has more than one side, and all of those sides are important.

Today, “my best side” in this post actually refers to somebody else showing a worst side.

Several decades ago, when I was in my 20’s, I was doing my best to create a marketing brochure at a high tech company. The high tech company had hired an advertising company, now defunct, to help us produce that brochure.  One day, the account manager of that advertising company, the project manager within my company, and I discussed who would appear in photographs for the brochure. Here’s the worst side of that conversation:

Project Manager:  We would like to use some of our employees in the photographs for this brochure.  As a matter of fact, we would like to include Ann in one of the photos.

Me: So, make sure you get my best side in the photo!

Account manager (turning to project manager): Well, in that case, she’d have to be bending over. (sleazy laugh)

Me (stunned and shaking my head):  WHAT?????

All of my sides were horrified that the account manager of an advertising agency we had hired had just objectified and dissed me, so blatantly, in front of me and my co-worker.  I was so appalled, I spoke to many people on different sides of my company, hoping to get them to see my side — that the account manager’s behavior was unacceptable, unprofessional, and worthy of swift retribution.

Here’s the worst side of the story —  nobody did anything about it.  The project manager didn’t protest, the female executive I spoke with suggested I just let my anger go, and the high tech company continued to work with the account manager and the advertising agency. I remember being VERY disappointed how none of the decision makers at my company took my side.

Why am I focusing on this dark side of human nature today?  Here’s my best answer for that: two days ago a candidate for President of the USA was shown demonstrating  a similar misogynistic and women-objectifying side. Today, as I write this, most sides are protesting his behavior, which I see as progress.

Back in the late 1970s, I would have wished that somebody else took my side when I was so egregiously objectified and dismissed.  However, I’m grateful for the opportunity to tell my side of that story, today.

What are the best sides of the photos I took yesterday, before I knew which side of myself I was going to show in today’s blog post?

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What does your best side believe about this post? On my side, I believe that I and other human beings deserve to be treated with respect on all sides.

My best side now wants to thank Aretha Franklin, my long-time friend Barbara (who colored “your beautiful heart”), my son Aaron (who FaceTimed with me from Scotland yesterday morning),   all those who helped me create today’s post and you — of course! — for witnessing and bringing different sides, here and now.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 37 Comments

Day 1027: Blanks

I’m drawing a blank, this morning, on what to write about.

Perhaps I’m drawing a blank because — instead of blanking out and relaxing, the way I usually do on a Saturday — I’ll be attending a retreat of group therapy leaders.

Perhaps I’m drawing a blank because I know that my mind might go blank, today, when it’s my turn to speak.  Even though I’m experienced in groups, my mind can go blank (especially if anybody in the group has a blank expression).

Perhaps I’m drawing a blank because I saw these, yesterday:

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I also saw this yesterday:

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If you’re drawing a blank for the answer to “Why didn’t the skeleton cross the road?” just fill in these blanks:

_ _    _ _ _ _

If nobody fills in those blanks, I will do so  later (after I return at ____ o’clock from the all-day group therapy retreat).

I’d like to find the words, now, to express how difficult it’s been to insert blanks into this blankety-blank post, but my mind’s a blank.

Was I shooting blanks when I took these other photos yesterday?

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Here’s what somebody whose name is _____ said, last night, about “Poverty is unnecessary day.”

Next month, perhaps Whole Foods will be advertising “cancer is superfluous day.”

When I tried to reply to that, my mind went blank.

What music makes your mind go blank?

Please fill in the blanks below this post with a comment, even if your mind’s a blank.

I’m drawing a blank on how to end this post, so …

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106 has a lot of blanks, doesn’t it?

Categories: blogging, group psychotherapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , | 25 Comments

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