Posts Tagged With: salmon dish

Day 2859: Great things

If you’re like me, you’ve been having trouble finding great things in the news lately.

Together, let’s look for great things in my photos from yesterday.

Did you find great things?  What great things did you find?

Did you notice great things here?

Sometimes we have to look close and hard for great things in order to find them. Sometimes those great things seem broken, but we need to keep looking, feeling, thinking, and acting.

The late great Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said many great things, including these:

“When a thoughtless or unkind word is spoken, best tune out. Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade.”
— From Ginsburg’s 2016 book “My Own Words”

“I went to law school when women were less than 3% of lawyers in the country; today, they are 50%. I never had a woman teacher in college or in law school. The changes have been enormous. And they’ve gone much too far (to be) going back.”
— From a 2019 NPR interview

“I pray that I may be all that (my mother) would have been had she lived in an age when women could aspire and achieve and daughters are cherished as much as sons.”
— From her 1993 Supreme Court acceptance speech, about her mother

“I see my advocacy as part of an effort to make the equality principle everything the founders would have wanted it to be if they weren’t held back by the society in which they lived and particularly the shame of slavery. I don’t think my efforts would have succeeded had it not been for the women’s movement that was reviving in the United States and more or less all over the world at the time.”
— From a 2013 WNYC interview

“Women will have achieved true equality when men share with them the responsibility of bringing up the next generation.”
— From a 2001 interview with the New York City Bar Association

“One thing that I did feel in law school was that if I flubbed, that I would be bringing down my entire sex. That you weren’t just failing for yourself, but people would say, ‘Well, I did expect it of a woman.’ … I was determined not to leave that impression.”
— From a 2020 Slate interview

“Dissents speak to a future age. It’s not simply to say my colleagues are wrong and I would do it this way, but the greatest dissents do become court opinions.”
— From a 2002 NPR interview, on her Supreme Court dissents

“The number of women who have come forward as a result of the #MeToo movement has been astonishing. My hope is not just that it is here to stay, but that it is as effective for the woman who works as a maid in a hotel as it is for Hollywood stars.”
— From a 2018 interview at the National Constitution Center, on the impact of the #MeToo movement

“If there was one decision I would overrule, it would be Citizens United. I think the notion that we have all the democracy that money can buy strays so far from what our democracy is supposed to be.”
— From a 2014 New Republic interview, on Citizens United v. FEC, which ruled that corporations could fund political speech under the First Amendment

“Fight for the things that you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you.”
— From a 2015 luncheon at Harvard

Who wants to join me in the fight for the things I care about, like the great legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg?

Here‘s a great 2017 interview with Ruth Bader Ginsburg:

Here‘s a great appearance by RBG on the Stephen Colbert show:

Here‘s Stephen Colbert last night about the great loss of Ruth Bader Ginsburg:

I look forward to great things in the comments section, below.

As always, I have great gratitude for all the great things in my life, including YOU.

Categories: 2020 U.S. Presidential election, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, quotes | Tags: , , , , , | 24 Comments

Day 2851: The Heat of the Day

Yesterday, when I was walking around in the heat of the day, I heard “The Heat of the Day” by the Pat Metheny Group.

The music of the Pat Metheny Group has helped me get through a lot of heat of many days, but I can never remember there being so much heat to get through before. Here and now, there’s the heat of

  • uncontrolled wild fires,
  • climate change,
  • the pandemic,
  • elections,
  • unrest,
  • injustice,
  • distrust,
  • lies,
  • ignorance,
  • personal attacks, and
  • panic about the future.

In all that heat of many days, it feels like we’re heading to the end of the world.

In the heat of my writing this post, the ironically soothing “To the End of the World” is playing, which is helping me deal with the heat of a new day.

Can you see the heat of the day in these images?

I do believe we’re stronger together, but the heat of these days seems to be driving us apart.

In the heat of this day, I will be providing crisis services remotely and training a new social work intern to withstand the heat of the day at the hospital.

In the heat of the moment, I shall chill by looking for your comments on this “Heat of the Day” post.

In the heat of your day, please remember my gratitude for all, including YOU.

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 29 Comments

Day 2841: Mood for a Day

When I was young, my mood for a day seemed to depend on how the Boston Red Sox were doing. If my favorite baseball team won, I had a good mood for a day. If they lost, I had a bad mood for a day. Many other people have had their moods for a day affected by the Red Sox; I’m not the only one who has had “Red Sox bipolar disorder.”

These days, my mood for a day seems to depend on the state of the U.S. November election. If it looks like my candidates are going to win, my mood is good for a day; if it looks like they are going to lose, my mood for a day is bad. I’m sure I’m not alone in this kind of daily mood disorder, either.

There are other things that influence my mood for a day. Can you see any of them in my recent moody photos?

Our moody kitty Harley recently showed an unexpected mood for a day — Harley jumped up on the sofa between my camera-shy husband and moody me and rubbed his head against my hand. That definitely improved my mood for a day and more. Yesterday, in the midst of many moods for the day, I said to Michael: “Harley hanging out with us and asking me to pat him was THE BEST.”

Here‘s the musical inspiration for today’s post:

Here‘s Steve Howe from Yes showing moody guitarists how to play “Mood for a Day”:

Here‘s Steve Howe improving people’s mood for a day by playing “Clap” and “Mood for a Day” live:

What affects your mood for a day, these days?

My mood for a day can always be improved with gratitude, so thanks to all who help me create this mood-for-a-day blog and to all who visit, including YOU.

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 24 Comments

Day 2831: Categories

If I were to categorize my associations with categories, they would include

  • a kid’s game I used to play with my friends in which we sang “categories, names of, (some category)” while clapping our hands and naming things in the category back and forth until somebody couldn’t think of one, which I cannot find categorized on YouTube (which I categorize as disappointing)  and
  • this online definition:

category[ kat-i-gawr-ee, -gohr-ee ]
noun, plural cat·e·go·ries.
any general or comprehensive division; a class.
a classificatory division in any field of knowledge, as a phylum or any of its subdivisions in biology.
Metaphysics.
(in Aristotelian philosophy) any of the fundamental modes of existence, such as substance, quality, and quantity, as determined by analysis of the different possible kinds of predication.
(in Kantian philosophy) any of the fundamental principles of the understanding, as the principle of causation.
any classification of terms that is ultimate and not susceptible to further analysis.
categories. Also called Guggenheim. (used with a singular verb) a game in which a key word and a list of categories, as dogs, automobiles, or rivers, are selected, and in which each player writes down a word in each category that begins with each of the letters of the key word, the player writing down the most words within a time limit being declared the winner.
Mathematics. a type of mathematical object, as a set, group, or metric space, together with a set of mappings from such an object to other objects of the same type.
Grammar. part of speech.

During these days, which I would categorize as staycation days for me, my son Aaron is trying to teach me about categories in mathematics (see above and see here).

Leon, who I would put in the categories of ex-husband, father of my son, friends, and people I love, showed up recently in this diagram of categories my son drew …

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… and also showed up yesterday …

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… with a framed photo of mine he put into the category of photos worthy of framing when he saw it in a recent blog post.

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I would put Leon’s actions —  printing out my picture,  framing it, and giving it to us  — into the categories of kind, creative, thoughtful, unexpected, and also very, very flattering.

What categories might we put these other recent pictures into?

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Jeanette, who I would also put into the categories of friends and people I love sent me this beautiful card …

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… which I would put into the category of condolence card for the loss of our cat Oscar, and so much more.  The  PictureThis app  (categorized as “Botanist in Your Pocket”) couldn’t place it into the category of flowers or plants.

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Dave Smith, who I would also put into the categories of friends and people I love as well as into the category of talented teacher and musician, provides today’s musical selection — “Time Waits for No One” from the album Dave Smith & Friends:

I’m looking forward to any comments of different categories, below.

Whatever categories I might put my blog into (which today includes “personal growth,” “photojournalism,” “friendship,” “definition,” and “life during the pandemic”), I should always include the category “gratitude.”  Thanks to all who help me create these categorized posts every day, including YOU!

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Categories: definition, friendship, gratitude, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 2816: Minor adjustments

Yesterday, after making minor adjustments so we could connect beautifully on a ZOOM call, my friend Barbara and I talked about her brilliant realization that major issues like the current pandemic can become much more bearable if you make minor adjustments.

During the call, we made minor adjustments so we could see and hear each other better and we discussed minor adjustments to important relationships, interpersonal strategies, our health, nature walks near us, our living spaces, our diet, our weight, Zen-like attitudes, and high school connections. Here are the photos I took of Barbara while we were talking about minor adjustments:

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That’s Barbara showing me a sunset outside her window and also a view within her apartment which reminds her of a Thomas McKnight painting.  Later in the day she sent me a better photo of that view which I should be able to find and share once I make some minor adjustments.  Hold on ….

Those minor adjustments included saving the draft of this post, shutting down my laptop, using my iPhone to find and include that photo, saving the post again, and restarting my laptop to continue creating this post, but I’ve adjusted to the minor adjustments required to bring you these blog posts, every day.

Do you see minor adjustments in any of the other adjusted images I’ve captured recently?

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Yes, I sometimes need to make minor adjustments to my self esteem and reading helpful feedback like Maddie’s helps in a very major way. The minor adjustment I would make to that text exchange is the fact that I am no longer President of my local group therapy organization.  I am having no trouble adjusting to that.

Also, I’m making minor adjustments to the original song I’m planning on singing at my Zoom-based 50th high school reunion in September.  I’ve adjusted this verse …

Now it’s 2020 and we’re all here
To connect over food and beer
To embrace the living and to miss our dead
As we gather here in Marblehead.

… to this …

Now it’s 2020 and we’re all here
To connect and give each other cheer,
To appreciate the living and to miss our dead
As we gather here on Zoom instead …. of Marblehead.

Knowing me, I’ll keep making minor adjustments to that song until I sing it on September 12.

Here‘s “Minor Adjustments” by Zaccai Curtis:

I just made the minor adjustment of following Zaccai Curtis on YouTube.

Please feel free to express minor or major thoughts about minor adjustments in the comments section, below.

Gratitude is another minor adjustment with major effects,  so thanks to Barbara, Maddie, Zaccai Curtis, Thomas McKnight, my family, my high school friends, adjusting cats, and everybody else who helps me create and adjust these daily blog posts, including YOU!

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Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments

Day 2810: Will to live

Will to live, according to Wikipedia, is

a concept developed by the German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, Will being an irrational “blind incessant impulse without knowledge” that drives instinctive behaviors, causing an endless insatiable striving in human existence, which Nature could not exist without.l

In the 2000 Year Old Man, Mel Brooks seems to answer one of Carl Reiner‘s questions about his incredible longevity with “will to live.”  When Carl Reiner presses further, the 2000 year old man says, “What?  No!  I mean my great doctor, Will Talive.  Dr. William Talive!”

Tomorrow, I’m going to see my great doctor, Dr. Deeb Salem, who will continue to help me live into my later years with my very rare congenital heart condition. It seems that both Dr. Salem (who is older than I am) and I have tremendous will to live.

Now, as I live, I will reveal the inspiration for today’s post:

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Yesterday, Michael and I wondered if our late kitty Oscar would still be alive today if we hadn’t given him a “peaceful passing” two weeks ago, because Oscar had such an amazing will to live.

Will you see the will to live in my other photos from yesterday?

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One of my readers — puella33 — had the will and the talent to transform one of my previous photographs into this wonderful painting:

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I’m so glad that beautiful painting will live in this blog.

Here is “The Will to Live” by Ben Harper:

Here are the opening lyrics of “The Will to Live” by Ben Harper:

I met a girl whose heart
Was on the right hand side
And upon the left
An angel did reside
They told her mother
That she never would survive
But she kept the rhythm
And is still alive.

I hope you will have the will to leave a comment.

As long as I have the will to live, I will express gratitude for everything, including YOU!

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Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 2784: The truth

The truth

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The truth is that I continue to go on walks with my husband and my son, wearing masks and maintaining social distancing.

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The truth is that our wonderful kitty Oscar is not going to get any better as he spends his final precious days with us.

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The truth is that there are heroes everywhere.

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The truth is that one of my heroes is my husband Michael, who prepares wonderful meals for us.

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The truth is that I also took these photos yesterday:

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The truth is that reminds me of this 11-year-old video of my son Aaron and our cat Oscar:

The truth is that

  • Oscar is a very chill and accepting cat,
  •  I would like to be more like Oscar, and
  • I am very grateful for all who are reading this, including YOU.

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Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

Day 2781: Turning around

In my mind, I’ve been turning around the pros and cons of euthanasia for our ailing and beloved cat, Oscar.  Yesterday morning, Oscar seemed so sick that I scheduled a home euthanasia visit for this afternoon. This morning, I am turning around to cancel that visit, because Oscar took a turn for the better yesterday afternoon.

I notice Oscar has trouble turning around without staggering in the morning. In the afternoons, he is turning around before he settles in my lap. And no matter what he is doing, he is still turning around to eat some delicious chicken whenever we offer it to him.

My son is not turning around in his belief that we should not euthanize Oscar. My husband Michael is turning around what he believes is right, depending on Oscar’s behavior.

I’m used to turning around many perspectives in my mind while making decisions, especially difficult ones like this one. With so much turning around, everybody seems a little dizzy, including Oscar.

Turning around to today’s photos, here’s the inspiration for today’s title:

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When I saw that sign yesterday, I thought there was probably no turning around from today being Oscar’s last day on earth.  However, in my life, I’ve experienced and witnessed so much turning around that nothing seems written in stone.

Last week, I witnessed people in my Coping and Healing groups turning around low self esteem by discussing positive attributes.  If anyone had trouble naming what they liked about themselves, the other group members had no trouble turning around to share what they appreciated about that person.

Every time I try to write my last letter from the President for the Northeastern Society for Group Psychotherapy, I keep turning around to other activities, like watching musicals on TV (including The Music Man, Bye Bye Birdie, and On The Town).

Here’s a thought that’s turning around in my mind: It’s difficult to say goodbye.

No matter where I am, I’m often turning around to take photos like these:

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In On the TownGene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, and Jules Munshin are playing sailors showing up and turning around in New York, New York:

There’s a lot of turning around in “You’re Awful” from On the Town, including Frank Sinatra and Betty Garrett  turning around the meanings of words:

What thoughts and feelings are turning around for you, here and now?  Consider turning around and leaving a comment, below.

At the end of each post, I’m turning around to gratitude, so thanks to all who help me turn out this blog every day, including YOU.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments

Day 2775: Closure

Because today is my last day as President of the Northeastern Society for Group Psychotherapy, I am thinking about closure.

As I wrote in another blog post about closure,

Closure is important, in order to move on.

There is no right or wrong way to do closure.

Closure is challenging, because it brings up old closures, which often relate to losses.

I like to use the term “ending the chapter”, when I talk to people about closure. Somebody, in my office, recently said that in their culture, they use the term “putting the period on the end of the sentence.” I like that, too.

Here’s what I’ve written, so far, about closure in my final letter from the President:

As I’ve thought about writing this, my final letter to you as President of NSGP, naturally my mind has gone to thoughts of closure. (Personally, I don’t like the word “termination”, because that sounds SO final.) As I have learned from my trainings at NSGP (and as I often tell people in my “Coping and Healing” drop-in groups) a good-enough sense of closure is critical in transitions — allowing us to appreciate what we’ve shared together and to move ahead better equipped for future challenges.

In my groups, we often discuss the insufficient and disappointing closures with family members, friends, work situations, organizations, and other important aspects of our life, and how this lack of satisfying closure in important transitions can keep us stuck. During these challenging days, when we might be feeling uncomfortably stuck, closure is especially important.

So what helps with closure? Saying what feels left unsaid.

Naming what you got.

Naming what you didn’t get.

Discarding what is not serving you well.

Later today, I will facilitate a “Coping and Healing” group on a telehealth platform (which I sometimes call “The Home Version of Coping and Healing”). At the end of the group, the participants will hear me, as usual, acknowledge the importance of  getting closure in the “wrap up” section of the group. I will introduce wrap-up by explaining, again, what helps with closure. I will invite discarding “what is not serving you well” by showing this to the group:

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That’s the magic waste paper basket, an important part of my Coping and Healing groups. If you throw something away in the magic waste paper basket, it will either go away or  come back less powerful.  Here’s an incomplete list of what people have thrown away in the magic waste paper basket:

  • self-judgment,
  • self-doubt,
  • difficult people,
  • unhealthy behaviors,
  • negative self-talk,
  • worry,
  • cognitive distortions,
  • pain, and
  • paper.

Do you see closure in these other images?

 

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We’re working on getting  humane closure with our 18-year-old cat, Oscar, who has cancer.

Here‘s “Closure” by Hayley Warner

… and “Closure” by Opeth:

I’ll get closer to closure by quoting this comment from YouTube about Opeth’s “Closure”:

Alex Mercer
1 year ago
The abrupt ending pisses me off. I need closure!!

Alex Mercer needs closure. Do you?

Gratitude helps me get closure, every day.

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Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 24 Comments

Day 2720: Oscar

Oscar, who deserves an Oscar for being the sweetest, most loving cat I’ve ever met, has cancer.

We’re grateful we still have the 18-year-old Oscar for more precious moments, even if we don’t know how many.

How many Oscars can you find in these photos from yesterday?

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There are four Oscar-worthy appearances of Oscar in videos I’ve posted on YouTube (here, here, here, and here)  over the past 13 years:

As you can see, Oscar has been a great supporting actor for both me and my son Aaron, who wisely picked him out of a shelter fourteen years ago.

Thanks to all sweet and supportive creatures, here and now, including YOU.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , | 34 Comments

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