Posts Tagged With: reaching out

Day 1954: Drowning

On Vivian the intern’s last day, I received this page at work.

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I assumed that page was from Vivian, drowning in all the tasks she needed to complete. And it was.  However, that page could have been from a lot of people, because many of us are drowning in tasks, work, obligations, news, politics, self-recrimination, violence, worry, guilt, and shame.

What do you do when you’re drowning?  Do you reach out, like Vivian?  How do you reach out?

I don’t worry about drowning in water, even though I can’t swim.  Being near water keeps me from drowning.  And so does blogging and taking photos, like these:

Here’s a live version of “Drowning in a Sea of Love” with Boz Scaggs and Donald Fagen.

I hope you don’t mind drowning in a sea of gratitude from me.

 

 

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

Day 1737: It’s too much to process

“It’s too much to process”  is something I hear people say, in my therapy groups and elsewhere.

“It’s too much to even process” is something Jimmy Kimmel said in his monologue last night about the Las Vegas mass shooting:

What do you do when it’s too much to process?  Do you cry, like Jimmy Kimmel did?  Is it numbing, a word Conan O’Brien used in his monologue about the largest mass shooting in U.S. history?

Do you ask, “How could this happen?” as Conan did there?  Do you say, “It makes no sense to me”? “Something needs to change”?  “I am truly heartbroken”?

When it’s too much to process, do you try to somehow make meaning of what’s happened? Do you try to get people to see things your way?  Do you get angry? Do you give up? Do you take action? Do you try to block things from your mind?  Do you distract yourself any way you can? Do you look for the good in people? Do you isolate? Do you blame? Do you pray?   Do you look for any humor you can find, for moments of relief?

Here are more (usually) humorous people responding to the same  too-much-to-process mass shooting:

It’s too much to process that Tom Petty is dead at age 66.

What do you do when it’s too much to process?

When it’s too much to process, I reach out to others.

I’m reaching out to you, here and now.

Feel free to process in a comment, below.

Thanks to all for processing with me today.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 38 Comments

Day 431: Why yesterday’s post was so short

Yesterday’s post was shorter than my CBN — Current Blogging Norm.

I’ve written short posts before — like Day 28: Losing the investment in the outcome, Day 68: Barriers to Connection,  Day 85: You’ll figure it out,  and, especially, Day 95: A startlingly brief post (which is, essentially, one line: “We are neither as unimportant or as important as we fear.”) — but not for a while.

Why was yesterday’s post — What I learned at the group therapy conference” — so short? Confidentiality created safety there, so there wasn’t much I could write.  Also, before composing that post, I wrote an email where I took some risks, so I had less time and energy to spare.

Don’t get me wrong: I think brief posts are fine.  Many of the posts I learn from, in the Blog-o-sphere, are short and sweet. Like this, this, and this, which I read here on WordPress, this morning.

And there are many famous sayings about the advantages of brief communications:

“Brevity is the soul of wit.”
― William ShakespeareHamlet

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“I have only made this letter longer because I have not had the time to make it shorter.”
(Letter 16, 1657)”
― Blaise PascalThe Provincial Letters

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“It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book.”
― Friedrich Nietzsche

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“The secret of a good sermon is to have a good beginning and a good ending; and to have the two as close together as possible.”
― George Burns

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“Be sincere, Be brief, Be seated.”
― Franklin D. Roosevelt

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“Like all sweet dreams, it will be brief, but brevity makes sweetness, doesn’t it?”
― Stephen King11/22/63

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“Writing is 1 percent inspiration, and 99 percent elimination.”
― Louise Brooks

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“A novel is just a story that hasn’t yet discovered a way to be brief.”
― George Saunders

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(thanks to Goodread, for the quotes and the images)

Here’s the soul of irony: This post can NOT be brief, now that I’ve included so many quotes about brevity.

So what else do I want to write, before this becomes a novel? How can I make the beginning and the ending of this “sermon” as close as possible?

While it may be too late for the latter, here are some final thoughts, for today:

That email I sent yesterday was one where I took some risks. I:

  1. wrote to somebody I admire,
  2. was authentic, and
  3. asked for help.

For me, that might be the very definition of a risky email.  I haven’t heard back, as of this writing.  Now, I’m waiting, to see if I get a response.

If I don’t, am I still glad I sent the email?

Yes.

Look what I did, right there, dear readers.   I was sincere, brief, and seated.

Thanks to President Roosevelt, to the other admirable advocates of brevity in this post (including A Small Act of Kindness, lead.learn.live, and Find Your Middle Ground),  and to you, for reading today.

Categories: inspiration, personal growth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

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