Posts Tagged With: NRA

Day 1879: Do it right!

Yesterday, when I was doing it right with Physical Therapy for my torn rotator cuff,  I  right away noticed this ….

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…. which was right on the top of this.

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Do it right and prevent fractures, injuries, and other problems in your everyday activities.

Is that too much pressure, to be told to do it right?  Is telling somebody to do it right the right way to promote acceptance and peace, especially if different people have different opinions about what’s right and how to do it right?

My opinion is that these high school students were doing it right yesterday when they were taking it to the streets, chanting “Gun Control!” and “NRA is not okay!”

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The New England weather wasn’t doing winter right yesterday with record high temperatures, but that was all right with me.

Did I do it right with these other photographs?

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Somebody did not do it right in that last photo.

After I do something, I wonder, “Did I do it right?”  I do it right by telling myself I did it well enough and then think about how I could do it better the next time.

The Doobie Brothers do it right.

Michael McDonald  and music students do it right at Berklee College of Music‘s 2011 commencement.

Do I do it right when I ask for feedback?

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Do-it-right thanks to all who help me do this daily blog and to those who do it right by reading it (including YOU).

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Day 1875: Tipping Point

At this point in my posts, I often define my terms.

tip·ping point

noun
the point at which a series of small changes or incidents becomes significant enough to cause a larger, more important change.

We might argue that the history of gun violence in the United States is not a series of small changes or incidents. Nevertheless, I still believe we may be at a tipping point of a large, important change because of people like Emma Gonzalez, a  senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, who survived the mass shooting on Wednesday.

I hope Emma Gonzalez — who makes many passionate points — and the United States will heal together.  And I hope we’re finally at a tipping point of saner gun laws.

I think about other tipping points in the United States, including Joseph Welch confronting Senator Joseph McCarthy on June 9, 1954:

Here’s the introductory description from that YouTube video.

Wisconsin Republican Senator Joseph R. McCarthy rocketed to public attention in 1950 with his allegations that hundreds of Communists had infiltrated the State Department and other federal agencies. These charges struck a particularly responsive note at a time of deepening national anxiety about the spread of world communism.

McCarthy relentlessly continued his anticommunist campaign into 1953, when he gained a new platform as chairman of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. He quickly put his imprint on that subcommittee, shifting its focus from investigating fraud and waste in the executive branch to hunting for Communists. He conducted scores of hearings, calling hundreds of witnesses in both public and closed sessions.

A dispute over his hiring of staff without consulting other committee members prompted the panel’s three Democrats to resign in mid 1953. Republican senators also stopped attending, in part because so many of the hearings were called on short notice or held away from the nation’s capital. As a result, McCarthy and his chief counsel Roy Cohn largely ran the show by themselves, relentlessly grilling and insulting witnesses. Harvard law dean Ervin Griswold described McCarthy’s role as “judge, jury, prosecutor, castigator, and press agent, all in one.”

In the spring of 1954, McCarthy picked a fight with the U.S. Army, charging lax security at a top-secret army facility. The army responded that the senator had sought preferential treatment for a recently drafted subcommittee aide. Amidst this controversy, McCarthy temporarily stepped down as chairman for the duration of the three-month nationally televised spectacle known to history as the Army-McCarthy hearings.

The army hired Boston lawyer Joseph Welch to make its case. At a session on June 9, 1954, McCarthy charged that one of Welch’s attorneys had ties to a Communist organization. As an amazed television audience looked on, Welch responded with the immortal lines that ultimately ended McCarthy’s career: “Until this moment, Senator, I think I never really gauged your cruelty or your recklessness.” When McCarthy tried to continue his attack, Welch angrily interrupted, “Let us not assassinate this lad further, senator. You have done enough. Have you no sense of decency?”

Overnight, McCarthy’s immense national popularity evaporated. Censured by his Senate colleagues, ostracized by his party, and ignored by the press, McCarthy died three years later, 48 years old and a broken man.

Sometimes, one person giving voice to shared outrage can tip a nation towards progress.

Let’s see if my one photo from yesterday supports tipping points.

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The United States has needed Joseph Welch and Emma Gonzalez, whom I love.

Thanks to all who have contributed to history’s positive tipping points and — of course! —  to you (especially if you make points in the comments section, below).

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 30 Comments

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