Posts Tagged With: Narrative Therapy

Day 2999: Narratives

For almost three thousand days in a row, I’ve been sharing personal narratives with you here.

As a practitioner of narrative therapy, I recognize that we each have our own way of telling stories. Narratives can be

  • tragic,
  • humorous,
  • heart-breaking,
  • heart-broken,
  • hopeful,
  • despairing,
  • positive,
  • negative,
  • connected,
  • disconnected,
  • clear,
  • confused,
  • thoughtful,
  • thoughtless,
  • triumphant,
  • self-defeating,
  • proud,
  • humble,
  • unresolved,
  • closed,
  • expansive, and
  • inevitably limited by one’s experience and perspective.

What narratives do you see in today’s images?

Here is “The Power of Personal Narrative” — a TED Talk by documentary filmmaker J. Christian Jensen, which I find powerfully inspiring:

Here is one of my musical heroes, Pat Metheny, sharing personal narratives about the album “Secret Story” almost thirty years ago:

I hope you share some narratives in the comments section below.

My narratives here always end with gratitude, so thanks to all who help me construct and share these daily narratives, including YOU.

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, therapy | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Day 2975: Self-destructive

When people in therapy tell me they are self-destructive, I think:

  • that is how they are telling the story about themselves for now,
  • it might be a helpful insight,
  • it might lead to hopelessness,
  • it might be a self-fulfilling prophecy,
  • it’s not destructive that they are in therapy,
  • there are other things they are doing that are not self-destructive, and
  • they are not destroyed.

I don’t think it’s self-destructive to share the inspiration for today’s blog title:

Is it self-destructive to share all of my recent images?

Is anybody being self-destructive in today’s video, a compilation of home news bloopers?

It would not be self-destructive to leave your thoughts and feelings about this “Self-destructive” post in the comments section, below. It’s also not self-destructive to express gratitude, so thanks to all who help me create these daily blogs, including YOU.

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, therapy | Tags: , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 2603: Metaphors

As an English literature major and a clinician practicing narrative therapy, I often notice metaphors, including thinly veiled ones:

If you read carefully that comic strip by Levni Yilmaz, you’ll also discover cognitive distortions including shoulds, emotional reasoning, labeling, and blaming.

Do you see any metaphors in my other captured images from yesterday?

img_1737-1

img_1741-1

img_1742

I wonder if it’s a metaphor that on this Presidents’ Day weekend my phone and my laptop are not communicating and are refusing to share images with each other. Maybe it’s a metaphor that I’m working harder to create these posts, starting on my phone and then completing my daily blog on my laptop.

Nevertheless, it’s easy enough to share this metaphor-filled song, performed by The Temptations and UB40:

I look forward to any metaphors, similes, or other figures of speech in your comments, below.

Thanks to all who helped me create this “Metaphors” post, including YOU!

img_1711

 

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism, Psychotherapy | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments

Day 2549: Changing the narrative

Yesterday, when I was visiting Right Turn, “an innovative substance use disorder program that makes use of both evidence-based treatment and creative expression” (which I wrote a narrative about in a previous blog post here), I saw this:

IMG_0343.JPG

That’s what effective, committed, and passionate healers and interventionists like Woody Geismann  do — they facilitate people changing the narrative of their life stories for the better. Woody has a lot of experience changing the narrative of his own life —  from the drummer of the Boston rock band the Del Fuegos to the founder of Right Turn and also from somebody who had a serious brain aneurysm in 2016 to a person who learned how to walk and talk again.

Do you see evidence of people changing the narrative in these photos?

IMG_0334.JPG

IMG_0335.JPG

IMG_0337

fullsizeoutput_3fb0.jpeg

 

 

IMG_0338.JPG

fullsizeoutput_3fb3.jpeg

IMG_0339.JPG

IMG_0344.JPG

IMG_0341.JPG

IMG_0340

 

IMG_0345.JPG

IMG_0346.JPG

fullsizeoutput_3fc2.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_3fc3

IMG_0352.JPG

 

fullsizeoutput_3fc0.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_3fc4.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_3fc1.jpeg

That’s Cynthia  (who as the new CEO of Right Turn is changing the narrative of the program while also preserving and expanding its power) sitting under a painting done by Woody, who changes narratives through music AND art. Cynthia and I had a great talk about how we’ve been changing the narratives of ourselves and others through different careers and through our experiences with different people.

Woody also changed my narrative of the Rolling Stones by telling me this story about them:

Ronnie and Keith were asked which of them was the better guitarist.  Ronnie said, “Of course, it’s me!”   Keith said, “Neither of us are particularly good guitarists, but together we create something special.”  Keith is a very wise person.

I’m probably changing the narrative of Woody’s wonderful story, because I didn’t write down his exact words.

Now I’m changing the narrative of this post by sharing my other photos from yesterday:

 

fullsizeoutput_3fb2.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_3fb1

IMG_0353.JPG

 

fullsizeoutput_3fb6.jpeg

IMG_0357.JPG

IMG_0359.JPG

Oscar is changing the narrative of who is interested in latkes on Chanukah.

Here’s today’s final example of changing the narrative:

fullsizeoutput_3fd4.jpeg

Michael (who makes latkes that are almost as fabulous as my late mother‘s) and I will be changing the narrative of our lives when we get married this Friday.

There are lots of videos about “Changing the Narrative” on YouTube. Here‘s one of them:

That Canadian Beekeeper is changing the narrative by asking for help and support, which we all need to survive.

I like changing the narrative through music,  so here is Eliza singing about changing the narrative in “Burn” from the musical Hamilton.

 

Now, you have the option of changing the narrative of this post by leaving a comment, below.

I’m not changing how I end every narrative in this blog. As always, I end with gratitude to all who helped me share all the narratives in today’s post and — of course! — to you, you, you.

fullsizeoutput_3fbf.jpeg

 

 

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Day 2515: 3 steps for perfect results

Yesterday, while I was taking non-perfect steps to leave the house and go to work, I noticed this:

IMG_9644.JPG

  1. I stopped.
  2. I took a picture.
  3. I thought, “That’s the title for tomorrow’s blog!”

After I took many more steps to get to my office, this was the perfect-enough result:

IMG_9650.JPG

  1. Show up.
  2. Be gentle.
  3. Tell the truth.

Those are 3 steps we can all take for great results.

I shall now take steps to share my other photos from yesterday.

IMG_9645.JPG

IMG_9646.JPG

IMG_9649.JPG

IMG_9647

IMG_9653.JPG

IMG_9655.JPG

fullsizeoutput_3ee3.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_3ee9.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_3ee6

IMG_9657.JPG

  1. I love my work.
  2. I love my son.
  3. I love all 3 versions of this song (here, here, and here).

  1. Don’t you worry about a thing.
  2. Leave a comment, if you like.
  3. Accept my thanks to all who help me take steps to create this daily blog, including YOU.

fullsizeoutput_3ed6

IMG_9439

IMG_9420

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 2514: Narrative

Because of the kind of narrator I am, I’m going to start today’s narrative with a definition of “narrative”.

NARRATIVE

noun
1. a story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious.
2. a book, literary work, etc., containing such a story.
3. the art, technique, or process of narrating, or of telling a story:
“Somerset Maugham was a master of narrative.”
4. a story that connects and explains a carefully selected set of supposedly true events, experiences, or the like, intended to support a particular viewpoint or thesis:
“to rewrite the prevailing narrative about masculinity”; “the narrative that our public schools are failing.”

Because I’m a psychotherapist who uses narrative therapy, I’m going to add to the narrative here with a description of that.

Narrative therapy is a form of psychotherapy that seeks to help people identify their values and the skills and knowledge they have to live these values, so they can effectively confront whatever problems they face. The therapist seeks to help the person co-author a new narrative about themselves by investigating the history of those qualities. Narrative therapy claims to be a social justice approach to therapeutic conversations, seeking to challenge dominant discourses that it claims shape people’s lives in destructive ways.

Yesterday, I noticed some self-destructive, outmoded, and fixed narratives, including

  • I am worthless.
  • I cannot trust anyone.
  • I am stuck forever.
  • I am weak.
  • If people knew the real me, they would reject me.
  • I am worthwhile only when I’m at my best.
  • People don’t want to listen to me.
  • Speaking up is dangerous.
  • Not speaking up is dangerous.
  • People who dislike me can ruin my life.
  • I am helpless.
  • If I ask for help, I won’t get it.
  • People, including me, are not capable of change.
  • There is no hope.

I always have hope that people can change their narratives.  After all, there are so many different ways to tell a story, even the story of your life.

Do my photos from yesterday create a narrative?

IMG_9616.JPG

IMG_9617.JPG

fullsizeoutput_3edb.jpeg

IMG_9623.JPG

 

 

fullsizeoutput_3edd.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_3edf

fullsizeoutput_3ede

fullsizeoutput_3eda.jpeg

IMG_9643.JPG

fullsizeoutput_3ed9.jpeg

The people at SoundBot are sharing the narrative, above, that every moment deserves a song. Here‘s a song — which intertwines lots of narratives — that I was listening to yesterday with my new SoundBot wireless musical earmuffs:

We all have a different, personal narrative of the events of September 11, 2001, but we all share elements of that painful narrative.

I look forward to the narratives in the comments, below.

I end every narrative here with gratitude, so thanks to all who help me create these daily posts, including YOU.

IMG_9614

 

 

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism, Psychotherapy | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

Day 2174: The exception that proves the rule

I wonder if this post will be the exception that proves the rule.  In order to know that, we need to know what “the exception that proves the rule” means.

“The exception proves the rule” is a saying whose meaning has been interpreted or misinterpreted in various ways. Its true definition, or at least original meaning, is that the presence of an exception applying to a specific case establishes (“proves”) that a general rule exists. For example, a sign that says “parking prohibited on Sundays” (the exception) “proves” that parking is allowed on the other six days of the week (the rule). A more explicit phrasing might be “the exception that proves the existence of the rule.”

An alternative explanation often encountered is that the word “prove” is used in the archaic sense of “test”.[1] Thus, the saying does not mean that an exception demonstrates a rule to be true or to exist, but that it tests the rule. In this sense, it is usually used when an exception to a rule has been identified:[clarification needed] for example, Mutillidae are wasps without wings which cannot fly, and therefore are an exception that proves (tests) the rule that wasps fly. The explanation that “proves” really means “tests” is, however, considered false by some sources.

Does that exceptional definition, from Wikipedia, prove anything?  Maybe we need to know what the rule is, here, before we prove any exception.

One of my rules here is providing some clarity and explanation about why I’m writing each of my daily posts.  Maybe this post will be an exception to that.

Or maybe not.   In narrative therapy, it’s important to identify exceptions to people’s unhelpful, generalized, negative rules about themselves and their lives.  For example, if somebody sees themselves as a loser or a failure, the narrative therapist helps them identify and talk more about the exceptions to that self-defeating rule.

When I hear exceptions outside my therapy office, I sometimes say, “That’s the exception that proves the rule.  Whatever that means.” I’m realizing now that I do know what it means.

Let’s see if any of my photos today illustrate “the exception that proves the rule.”

IMG_1547

Usually we don’t have balloons of woodland creatures in the cafeteria at work.  Yesterday, there was a holiday celebration called “Wintery Woodlands,” where employees received hot chocolate, chocolate-covered pretzels, a calendar, and a lunchbox.  Because I’m exceptionally distracted these days, I left my calendar and lunchbox in the cafeteria. The rule is only one calendar and lunchbox for everyone, so I guess I’m out of luck.

IMG_1548

That’s my new and exceptional co-worker, Alice.  She’s also taking a picture of the wintry woodlands in that photo.  I have a rule, in this blog, of not identifying where I work. I don’t think this photo is an exception to that. (Although I have slipped, one or two times, during the two thousand, two hundred, and ten days of blogging, so I guess those posts are exceptions that prove the rule.)

IMG_1554

I’ve taken a lot of photos of this hotel marquee, but none of them have ever said, “12 Days of Music.”   I am predicting that this photo won’t be the last one that says that. I’ve also included a lot of music in this daily blog, but I don’t remember ever including any punk.  If so, today will be the exception that proves the rule.

Here’s a punk rock cover of “Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer.”

 

If you usually don’t comment, why not make today the exception that proves the rule?

I’m considering not thanking people at the end of this post (which definitely is a rule at this blog), but some rules I do not want there to be an exception to.  So, exceptional thanks to all those who helped me create today’s blog and — of course! —  to YOU.

IMG_1551

 

 

Categories: definition, personal growth, Psychotherapy | Tags: , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

Day 1306: Stories

My story — and I’m sticking to it — is that everybody has the right to tell his-story or her-story.

Last night, people in my therapy group told many important and interesting stories.  As an exercise, I suggested that we each create and illustrate our own personal book  — building that story in just twenty minutes!

Here’s the story I created in group last night:

IMG_3702

 

IMG_3703

IMG_3704

These other images were part of my story yesterday:

IMG_3700

IMG_3705

IMG_3706

IMG_3707

IMG_3709

How would you tell your story in just twenty minutes? What might be the background music for your story?

This storied song was part of my story, yesterday:

I always end the story of each of these daily posts with gratitude for all who help me write my story and for those who read it — especially you!

Categories: blogging, group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , | 23 Comments

Day 996: What’s the story?

What’s the story?

What’s WHAT story?

One story at a time. On my way to work, yesterday, I saw this …

IMG_5103

… and I wondered,  “What’s the story?”

Whenever a story has parts unknown to us, we make up stories to understand, make meaning, and move on. When I saw those abandoned baby shoes lined up neatly outside of Boston’s Fenway Park, I thought

What’s the story I would make up about that? And what stories would other people make up about it?

For the rest of the day, I thought about stories.

What’s the story with that?

Well, since I’m

  • a psychotherapist,
  • an English major, and
  • somebody who loves to read and write

… stories are very important to me. No mystery, there.

What’s the story, with these other photos I took yesterday?

IMG_5099IMG_5104 IMG_5110 IMG_5114IMG_5113 IMG_5115 IMG_5116 IMG_5119 IMG_5120 IMG_5123

What’s the story you might create, about any of those images?

What’s the story with today’s music?

What’s the story with “Aja” by Steely Dan?

I chose “Aja” today because

  1. I heard it on my walk home, when I was looking at some of the above images,
  2. I’ve never included it in a blog post before, and
  3. people tell lots of different stories about that song, including these (from this web page):

The song is pronounced “Asia,” and was inspired by the continent. Steely Dan have several songs with a Far East influence, since Donald Fagen believes it is a symbol of sensuality. He told Rolling Stone magazine that the title came from a high school friend whose brother was in the army and came back with a Korean wife named Aja, although he wasn’t sure how she spelled it.

I thought it very obvious that the song is about a fictional Bordello on the California coast, perhaps San Francisco area. That’s why you hear the police whistle. The part with Wayne Shorter’s is where the police raid the place.

Yet another subtle drug reference in their music: “Break out the hardware, let’s do it right.” Hardware is another name for the needle, spoon, flame used for shooting up, mainly heroin.

When they refer to the folks up on the hill how they don’t give a damn. It’s CAPITOL HILL….. duh?

Louis Armstrong called jazz “Chinese music”, you can guess along with me why (my guess – that jazz is not rational and western, it’s intuitive yet has its own definite yet different kind of logic). So this song is about playing jazz for people who often don’t get it or don’t care.

Since I live near San Francisco, I interpret “up on the hill” to be wealthy bored people on Nob Hill. Coincidentally, someone wrote that Kid Charlemagne” also had a reference to “up on the hill”, and that song was about Owsley Stanley, the guy who (among other things) synthesized acid for the acid tests in SF.

The story goes that Steve Gadd walked into the studio in NYC – put on the cans – and 8 minutes later – he was finished – one take ! Had the privilege of seeing him in Johannesburg with Joe Sample and Randy Crawford. AJA is the perfect number !

The lyrics of Aja paint a picture of a man, perhaps a heroin addict or drug dealer whose only salavation day after a day is running home to the arms of Aja…which lends credence to the lyric of “when all my dime dancing is through, I run to you”

While Donald Fagan wrote the song about a friend’s South Korean wife, named Aja, you cannot help but think that the courtship began as a man knowing where to get his ultimate fix.

The model on the cover of the album “Aja” is not Korean but Japanese. Her name is Sayoko Yamaguchi, whom Newsweek chose her one of the top six models in the world in 1977. She passed away on August 14, 2007.

i was named after this song, and i have great appreciation for its perfection and character, but my middle name is Victoria, and 8 out of ten people ask if that is a porno name…

What’s the story with that?  SO many stories, about just one song, from just one website. And, I’ve told stories to myself about that song, for years, that are different from each one of those stories above.

What’s the story you might create about “Aja”?   Please listen to it, if only to experience the story of its brilliance.

Finally, what’s the story with all the various stories in this post?

Here’s my story. I believe that

  1. being as much as possible in the present moment,
  2. being present with all your senses,
  3. letting go of fears about the future and regrets about the past, and
  4. telling the story of your life, in new and illuminating ways

… can help us all heal, learn, and grow.

Gotta go hear some more stories at work, dear readers.

Thanks to all the people, places, and stories that helped me create this storytelling post and thanks to you — of course! — for reading all the stories here, today.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism, Psychotherapy | Tags: , , , | 33 Comments

Day 866: Looking up

Since my heart-related surgery 12 days ago, many things have been looking up, including me.

Almost every time I looked up where I  work last week, I saw people looking up to each other in group and individual therapy. Looking up at them, as they worked on looking up in their lives, I heard language like

“Floating”
“Rising”
“Flying”
“Staying above it all”

The language of looking up affects how we look at things, I believe.

Yesterday, I saw the following images, as I was looking up:

       

          

  
              

Looking up at those photos, I see the familiar and the unexpected. What do you see, when you are looking up?

This photo …

… which I took looking up in the cafeteria at work, reminds me that when we look up, we often see birds (and, sometimes, gluten-free food).

Speaking of birds, as I’m looking up ahead to my June audition for the  musical Follies (with music by Stephen Sondheim, whom I greatly look up to),  I’m looking up at this bird-related Sondheim song as a possible audition piece:

Looking up at that video, I wonder if I’m setting my sights (and my voice) too high with “Green Finch and Linnet Bird” from Sweeney Todd.  Things will probably look up if I imagine my audience looking up at me, while I’m singing,  with appreciation and approval.

If more upbeat music and lyrics help you look up, I just heard Los Lobos, in “A Matter of Time,”  sing

It will be all right

As I’m looking up at this post I’ve just written, I want to express something else about “looking up.”

After dealing with scary uncertainties and difficult decisions (especially about my health) — as I have the last six months — it can be difficult to put all that aside and  focus on looking up.

Things are definitely looking up today, in that regard. I suppose it was only a matter of time. 

I’m looking up, with thanks, to people I work with, to all those who help us find our way, to my fellow social worker Lauren, to worms and bots, to Fenway Park, to Wild Willie’s in Watertown Massachusetts, to Stephen Sondheim, to cast members of Sweeney Todd, to finches of all colors, to linnet and ceramic birds, to Los Lobos,  and to you — of course! — for looking up, here and now.

Categories: gratitude, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , | 31 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.