Posts Tagged With: Merriam-Webster

Day 2826: Blind spots

A Merriam-Webster definition of “blind spot” would hit the spot:

BLIND SPOT
1a: the small circular area at the back of the retina where the optic nerve enters the eyeball and which is devoid of rods and cones and is not sensitive to light
— called also optic disk

— see EYE ILLUSTRATION
b: a portion of a field that cannot be seen or inspected with available equipment

2: an area in which one fails to exercise judgment or discrimination

Examples of blind spot in a Sentence
When driving on the highway, you need to make sure no one is in your blind spot before changing lanes.
She has a blind spot concerning her son’s behavior.

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Do you see any blind spots in that definition or in my images from yesterday?
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Have you noticed that millions of people in the United States have  huge blind spots?

Sometimes I wonder if the format for these blog posts creates blind spots and whether people miss some of the words I put in spots. I try to keep wonder from turning into worry, because worry creates blind spots for me.

Let’s see if there are any blind spots on YouTube.

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Blind spots don’t get in the way of my finding gratitude, wherever I look.

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Categories: definition, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 30 Comments

Day 2759: Way stations

I just found my way to an online way station that has a definition of “way station.”


way station (noun)

Definition of way station

1: a station set between principal stations on a line of travel (such as a railroad)
2: an intermediate stopping place

Synonyms

station, stop

Examples of way station in a Sentence

a way station for truck drivers

Recent Examples on the Web

The house became a gathering place for an indelible cultural moment, a way station for Andy Warhol, Terry Southern, Ike and Tina Turner, and Black Panthers.
— Mark Rozzo, The New Yorker, “Dennis Hopper’s Quiet Vision of Nineteen-Sixties Hollywood,” 22 Dec. 2019


In my way, I tried to make that definition of “way station” a way station (an intermediate stopping place) within today’s post.

I think it’s helpful, here and now, to think of every thing we experience — alone and together — as way stations on our way to where we are going.

Do you see any way stations in my photographs from yesterday?

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As I’m moving among way stations, I often listen to The Way Up by the Pat Metheny Group. Here’s one performance of The Way Up from the way station YouTube:

 

On your way today to other way stations, I hope you spend some time listening to The Way Up and also in the way station of the comments sections, below.

No matter what the way station, I am grateful to be there and grateful for YOU.

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Categories: definition, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Day 2542: Quid Pro Quo

Lately, there’s been a lot of  this-for-that activity in the news using the phrase “quid pro quo.” 

If I include  a definition of “quid pro quo”  for you here, will you  leave a comment for me below?

quid pro quo

noun
\ kwid-ˌprō-ˈkwō \

: something given or received for something else
also : a deal arranging a quid pro quo

Synonyms:

back-and-forth, barter, commutation, dicker, exchange, swap, trade, trade-off, truck

Quid Pro Quo and the Apothecary:
In the early 16th century, a quid pro quo was something obtained from an apothecary. That’s because when quid pro quo (New Latin for “something for something”) was first used in English, it referred to the process of substituting one medicine for another—whether intentionally (and sometimes fraudulently) or accidentally. The meaning of the phrase was quickly extended, however, and within several decades it was being used for more general equivalent exchanges. These days, it often occurs in legal contexts.

Examples of quid pro quo in a Sentence:
In politics nobody does something for nothing: there’s always a quid pro quo involved.

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Recent Examples on the Web:
The investigation revolved around suspicions of a quid pro quo — whether the Interior Department rejected a casino application in exchange for campaign contributions from other tribes that opposed the project.
— Ian James, azcentral, “He took down dams, freed wolves and preserved wildlands. Bruce Babbitt is still at work,” 14 July 2019
Sullivan, who secretly recorded the meeting, disputes that characterization and says the two lawmakers offered him a quid pro quo.
— James Barragán, Dallas News, “What was motive for Texas House Speaker’s secret meeting? ‘Target list’ or effort to keep GOP majority,” 23 Aug. 2019
These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word ‘quid pro quo.’ Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of quid pro quo
1582, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for quid pro quo
New Latin, something for something

I shall now share two things I noticed in that Merriam-Webster definition.   Might you do the same?

  1. I don’t know what a truck is doing there.  These days, I would much rather see a fuel-efficient vehicle than a truck, no matter where it is.  (For my readers in the UK, when I say “truck” I mean a lorry or a wagon.  Now that I’ve cleared that up for you, what will you do for me?)
  2. I can’t believe that those are the most recent examples on the web.

Here are some Quid Pro Quo-tes, from elsewhere on the web.

“Rich people show their appreciation through favors. When everyone you know has more money than they know what to do with, money stops being a useful transactional tool. So instead you offer favors. Deals. Quid pro quos. Things that involve personal personal involvement rather than money.  Because when you’re that rich, your personal time is your limiting factor.”  — John Scalzi, Lock In

“True friendship has no checks or balances.  Once somebody starts Keeping Score, the game is over.” — Kate McGahan

“… and no man gave you a fur coat without expecting to receive something in return. Except for one’s husband, of course, who expected nothing except modest gratitude.” — Kate Atkinson, A God in Ruins

“Yes, you scratch my back and I scratch yours. But shouldn’t we, one of these evenings, sit down to figure out why our backs are always so itchy in the first place?” — Rajesh’, Random Cosmos

Let’s see if there are any quid pro quos in these recent quid-pro-photos.

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I gave compliments to the chef in exchange for last night’s delicious meal.

I’m now going to post a song, from the musical Rent, which I think illustrates quid pro quo.

If you know any similar songs, feel free to share them with us all.

Many thanks to veterans, writers, performers, cooks, cats, and all those who helped me create this quid-pro-quo post, including YOU.

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 23 Comments

Day 2253: Cave

Because I caved, despite my avowed avoidance of social media, I just saw this from Merriam Webster on Twitter:

We’re seeing a 1500% spike on “cave” this evening.”

When we descended into the cave of television news last night, I asked my boyfriend Michael, “Why is everybody characterizing the temporary end to the government shutdown as a cave?  Why is that news agency calling Trump “Cave Man?” Is that going to help? How can there be cooperation when there are no exceptions to this win-or-lose philosophy? Does everybody have to act like they’re seven years old?  Where are the adults in the room?”

Michael agreed with me.  Was that a cave?

Maybe this result of searching for “CNN cave man” can throw some light on the subject:

There’s a little cave man in all of us.

I’m not going to cave and make some stupid joke about that headline, but I will share this more inspiring result of searching for “CNN cave.”

The Thai cave rescue ended in success. But only two weeks ago, it all seemed hopeless

I remember, last July, when the world seemed to be caving in, that story about the rescue of the twelve young boys and their soccer coach from the Thai cave helped us all emerge from the cave of hopelessness, at least temporarily.

Is it a cave if you look at my photos from yesterday?

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While that might look like scrawlings from  a cave, that last photo shows my writing all the topics from a group therapy session on the wall of a group room.

Walls and caves.  Caves and walls. Will we ever escape this cave of  confusion?

Michael loves Nick Cave.

If I ask you to leave a comment below, is it a cave if you comply?

Even when I’m in a dark cave, I look for the light of gratitude.  Thanks to all who helped me create this cave of a post and — of course! — YOU.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

Day 2089: Duh

Yesterday, I wrote and read “DUH!” in a therapy group.

Would it help for me to share why and how I did that?  Duh.

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Things that are right side up are, duh, easier to read.

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What does “Self Care” mean to you?  It means taking care of my self.  DUH!

Self Care also means balancing my needs with other people’s needs and, duh, this:

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Well, duh!  It’s time for a definition of “duh.”

duh

interjection
\ ˈdə , usually with prolonged ə \
Definition of Duh
1 —used to express actual or feigned ignorance or stupidity
Duh, I don’t know.
2 —used derisively to indicate that something just stated is all too obvious or self-evident
Well, duh!
Examples of Duh in a Sentence
Recent Examples on the Web

Lee and his family are buried there, his marble, recumbent statue adorning the campus chapel known as, duh, Lee Chapel.
— Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati.com, “Doc: No clear solution to offensive symbols,” 22 Aug. 2017
Well, duh. Prescott ranked third in the league in passer rating, ahead of Aaron Rodgers and Drew Brees.
— Pat Fitzmaurice, SI.com, “Dallas Cowboys Fantasy Football 2017 Preview: Can Elliott Repeat Breakout Season?,” 2 Aug. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word ‘duh.’ Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

That definition of “duh” is, duh, from Merriam-Webster.   How would you define “duh”?

You’re probably asking yourself if I have any other photos today.  I didn’t have enough time yesterday to include all my photos and I’ve taken more photos since so, duh.

Michael cooked me a delicious meal yesterday. Duh.

Are there any “Duh” videos on YouTube?  Duh.

No Duh.

I love comments. Duh.

Thanks to all who helped me create today’s “Duh”  post and — of course (duh!) — to YOU.

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Categories: definition, group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Day 1767: Unlawful

What does “unlawful” mean to you?

Here‘s what it means to Merriam-Webster:

Definition of unlawful

1 :not lawful :illegal
2 :not morally right or conventional
— unlawfully \ˌən-ˈlȯ-f(ə-)lē\ adverb
— unlawfulness  \ˌən-ˈlȯ-fəl-nəs\ noun

First Known Use: 14th century

So now we know that unlawful means “not lawful.” Is that helpful or not helpful?

Also, is morally right really equivalent to conventional? Personally, I strive to be morally right but rarely strive to be conventional.

I also wonder what “unlawful” meant in the 14th century and how the meaning has changed over time.

These days, when I read the news (which is still lawful, as far as I know), I see many stories about people in power being unlawful, which is awful (“unlawful” minus the first three letters).

Is this photo unlawful, lawful, or awful?

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What about this one?

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“MKM” are the initials of my boyfriend Michael.  If I had written that on a wall, would that have been unlawful? How about taking a picture of it, like I did yesterday?

Here‘s Unlawful singing “You’re Not Alone.”*

I’m glad it’s not unlawful to sing or say “You’re Not Alone,” because that’s a very important message of group therapy (which I practice lawfully in Boston).

Here and now, it’s not unlawful to

  • blog,
  • leave comments, and
  • express gratitude to all who helped me create this”unlawful” post and to you — of course! — for lawfully reading it.

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* Perhaps it was unlawful to use that video of Unlawful, because sinceI published this post,  that video has disappeared.

Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 30 Comments

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