Posts Tagged With: Jackie Chan

Day 3207: Sports

Two notable and different sports events happened yesterday in Boston: (1) The Boston Marathon (usually held in April) and (2) the Red Sox, against all odds, defeating the Tampa Bay Rays to advance in the American baseball playoffs. Here’s some reporting from ESPN about the unlikely Red Sox win:

I never played sports because of my heart condition, but as somebody once said, “If you can’t play a sport, be a sport.” Can you see sports in my images for today, many of which I took while going for a three-hour walk yesterday?

Here’s what I find on YouTube when I search for “sports”:

Be a sport and leave a comment, okay?

If gathering and expressing gratitude were a sport, I’d be an elite athlete!

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Day 3206: Do you realize how lovable you are?

Yesterday, when I was loving people’s responses on Twitter, I asked this question:

Do you realize how many people do not realize that they are lovable? I don’t love that but I do love that many responded with “yes” and “I’m working on it.”

Do you realize how much I love sharing words and images here with you every day?

Do you realize how much I love snowy egrets, Jackie Chan, the Daily Bitch, and embracing whatever comes my way?

Do you realize that loving more (including loving ourselves) helps us love and appreciate each precious day?

Do you realize what you can find on YouTube when you search for “do you realize how lovable you are?”

Besides “Do You Realize” by the Flaming Lips, you can also find this:

I realize that I love that video by Psych2Go.

Do you realize that you can leave a comment below and that I always end my blog posts with gratitude for lovable YOU?

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 3018: Why is it so difficult for people to stay in the moment?

Whenever I invite people to stay in the moment, rather than thinking about the future or the past, I acknowledge how difficult that is to do. Every moment, people agree with me. It’s difficult to stay in the moment — the human mind wants to go into the past and/or the future.

In this moment, it occurs to me to ask the question: Why is it so difficult for people to stay in the moment? When people do stay in the moment — experience the present with all their senses — they appreciate the break from regrets about the past and worries about the future. And yet it remains so difficult to stay in the moment.

Because I can’t answer the question I posed in the moment, I just tweeted this:

Before I finish this post, I’ll check back on Twitter to see if I have any answers.

In the meantime, notice the focus on the future and the past in these other images I am sharing in the moment.

In the moment, I think the Daily Bitch is inviting us to stay in the moment.

There are no answers to my question on Twitter, so I’ll see if there are answers on YouTube to “Why is it so difficult for people to stay in the moment?”

Here is Eckhart Tolle with “Accepting the Present Moment not the Life Situation!”

As usual, it’s difficult for me to stay in the moment as I’m reminiscing about my son’s past YouTube “Louie Louie” creation

… and wondering if I will find any videos of Jackie Chan dancing:

Still no answers on Twitter in the moment, so I’ll ask you: Why is it so difficult for people to stay in the moment?

It’s not difficult for me to stay in the moment with gratitude, so thanks to all who help me blog every day, including YOU.

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 28 Comments

Day 1951: Vivian

Vivian is a social work intern who makes me smile, especially when she shows me photos like this:

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Yesterday, Vivian and I  made each other cry because it was her last day at work.  Soon, as a new graduate,  she’ll be off on her own road trip to Chicago.

In the final Friday therapy group she facilitated with me, we discussed goodbyes and helpful phrases like “The pain of a loss is a direct reflection of the importance of the connection” and “How lucky I am to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard.”

Vivian, who is a very gifted student, shared many gifts yesterday.

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In honor of the many  things Vivian and I shared this year,  here‘s Jackie Chan singing “Believe in Yourself.”

I hope Vivian believes in herself,  as many of us in her community believe in her.

Vivian let me know she appreciates my gratitude. I am very grateful for Vivian, Jackie Chan, Nikita Gill, A. A. Milne, Rupi Kaur, healing groups and communities, and — of course! — YOU.

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments

Day 1745: Chaos

When I scan the news headlines this morning, I keep noticing the word “chaos.”

Some people thrive on chaos. Most people don’t.

How does chaos affect you? Does it scare you?

Should I apologize for the chaos in this random collection of photos?


Time flies when you’re having fun, said somebody sometime. Do you have time for some musical chaos?

Even in the midst of chaos, I give thanks to all who help me create some order out of chaos by blogging and — of course! — to you.

Categories: blogging, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments

Day 1656: Holding on

I’m holding on to many things as we pack up to move, including

  • my sense of humor,
  • things I find valuable,
  • my job,
  • creatures I love,
  • my thoughts,
  • my feelings,
  • my sanity, and
  • my iPhone, so I can be put on hold and also take pictures of my holdings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Before I started writing today’s blog post, I got a little ferklempt at the end of this excerpt from last night’s Jimmy Kimmel Show (which is holding on here at YouTube):

 

As always, I’m holding on to gratitude for all those who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — for you, who keep me holding on.

 

 

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

Day 1652: Here and now, there and then

Here and now, we’re getting ready to move, so I’m unearthing many memories from there and then.

There and then, I’ve created my own t-shirts.

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The first t-shirt I ever created, there and then, had the Chinese name for Jackie Chan (“become the dragon”). There and then I loved that t-shirt, especially because I was born in the Year of the Dragon.

Here and now are more memories from there and then.

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I hope it’s okay, here and now, that I include three musical numbers from there and then (here, here, here and now on YouTube).

In the words of Pat Metheny, “We Live Here.”  Together.

As always, I express thanks to those who helped me create this then-and-there, here-and-now post and to you — of course! — for being here, now.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 34 Comments

Day 1519: The Oscars

I watched the Oscars yesterday.

I also watched Oscar yesterday.

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Oscar watched the Oscars, Harley, and me.

I also watched all these things yesterday:

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Do any of those pictures deserve Oscars?

Jackie Chan got an Oscar!  Here he is, singing a song:

I would give everybody Oscars, including you for being here, now.

Categories: personal growth | Tags: , , , , , | 49 Comments

Day 496: Fun with Phobias (Part III*)

Several months ago, I wrote two posts about phobias (here and here), which I defined like so:

…  personal, inexplicable, exaggerated, and illogical fears I’m feeling …. in the present.

When I thought of “Fun with Phobias” in February, I knew it was a personal blogging goldmine (or “cash cow,” as people say in the marketing biz). That is, this was a topic I could use repeatedly, getting new value from it with minimal effort.

And yet, while I returned to that blogging golden cow the very next day, I have not used it since.

In the therapy biz, here’s a question people often ask:

Why now?

That is, why am I returning to this topic, on this particular day, after a hiatus of many months? As usual, I have a multi-part answer:

  • A friend recently used the word “fearless” to describe me. I took issue with that label, and we discussed how I (and he, too) actually do this:

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  • I have lots of seemingly unrelated photos I want to show you, and — since I am capable of feeling fear about almost everything — this topic should provide an easy way to introduce whatever-the-hell pictures I want.
  • It’s Mother’s Day, and Mom-o-phobia is something some people may have felt or experienced, at least for moments (although I’m not experiencing that now, in any way).

While I could, at this point, indulge in some Intro-Blog-o-Phobia (the fear of writing a not-good-enough beginning for a post) … instead, let’s proceed to phobias with photos.

Okay!

1.  Miss-o-Phobia.

The fear of missing things — including people, experiences, and objects (in the past, present, and future).

For example, I saw this penguin, a week or so ago:

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Then, a few days ago, I took another picture at the same location, to show how a tree there had blossomed:

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And, while I noticed changes to the tree … what did I totally miss?  Changes to the penguin.

Eeeeek!

These days, I might also experience Miss-o-Phobia about:

  • Co-workers.
  • The groups and individuals I do psychotherapy with (when my health is better).
  • My mother.
  • My father.
  • Anything or anybody not in my immediate vicinity, at the present moment.

Eeeeek!

2.  Ticket-o-Phobia.

Two meanings: (a) the fear of forgetting, losing, or otherwise not-having-on-hand a necessary ticket (for a trip or an event) and (b) the fear of getting a parking ticket.

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Note: The latter manifestation of this phobia is often co-morbid* with Quarterlessness-o-phobia, the fear of not having the correct change.

Eeeek!

3.  New-o-phobia.

The fear of experiencing something or somebody never encountered before.

I experienced this feeling yesterday, on my way to meet somebody new:

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Wait! Who is that?

Guesses, anybody?

Time’s up!

That’s The Culture Monk, a blogger I admire, a/k/a Kenneth Justice.  Kenneth has been taking his show on the road, with his “Drinking in the Culture Tour,” and I went to see him at a coffee house in Cambridge, MA.

It was great to hang with Kenneth for an hour, and talk about many things, including the past, present, and future of blogging and (not surprisingly) fear (eeeek!).

I told Kenneth, when I met him, that he wasn’t as intimidating as I had feared.  Instead, he was instantly easy to talk to (which I also knew, on some level, from reading his blog).

As usual, my fears of the new — once I faced them — were unfounded.

And, as I was reminding myself on my way to meet him, Kenneth was NOT new to me. I have been meeting up with him, here in the blog-o-sphere, for quite a while.

Whenever you encounter something new, familiarity is also there somewhere (although you might miss it).

Speaking of that, those who are familiar with ME may have noticed, in that last photo, somebody else I admire: Jackie Chan*** (in the lower left).

Yes, Jackie Chan was NOT new to me yesterday and … neither was The Culture Monk.

So, maybe the old saying is true:

There is nothing new under the sun.

Which gives me a GREAT excuse to end this post with some other photos, recently taken under the sun.

In order of appearance:

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Happy Mother’s Day!

Thanks to everything and everybody who helped me write this post, including fears, Susan Jeffers, parents, work, Kenneth Justice, Jackie Chan, the sun, the Dalai Lama,  and … you!


* The number in the post title is a roman numeral meaning “3,” although I could easily have written 110 previous posts about this topic.

** “Co-morbid” in the therapy biz means “occurring at the same time.” Despite the way it looks, it has nothing to do with death. (Eeeek!)

*** I’ve blogged about Jackie Chan before: here, here, here, and here.

Categories: inspiration, personal growth, photojournalism, quiz | Tags: , , , , , | 29 Comments

Day 229: Unsolved Mysteries

I’ve never seen the show “Unsolved Mysteries,” but what better way to start off this identically-named blog post, than this:

(If there is a better way, I have no idea what it is.)

I like to think about mysteries, as I’ve mentioned before.  Skilled detectives — who pay attention in the moment and who use all their resources to solve puzzles and sometimes even right wrongs —  have definitely been heroes of mine, throughout my life.

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For this blog post, I would like to share a personal, recently experienced mystery.

THE SPECKLED SHIRT

by Ann Koplow

On our penultimate day in Scotland, my son and I were in our hotel room, when I heard him cry …

What’s this??

I looked over,  to see him standing by his open and yet unpacked suitcase,  holding up one of his favorite shirts. Safe in the assumption that my son knew what a shirt was, I waited for him to say more. And he did.

What the heck??? 

And then,

Look at these red marks, all over my shirt!!!

I moved closer to son’s outstretched arms and the shirt, dangling lifeless and forlorn — perhaps as the unknown but deliciously fresh fish I had just eaten at a nearby restaurant had recently dangled from a Scottish fishhook.

As I inspected the shirt — my son’s continuing cries of “What the heck?” ringing in my ears — I noticed these:

Tiny splashes of red, covering his shirt. The more I looked at the shirt, the more of these I saw.

What were they?

Could they be ….

BLOOD?

Nope. Wrong color red.

Could they be …

RED LIQUID HE HAD SPILLED WHILE WEARING THIS SHIRT?

Nope. He hadn’t worn that shirt in days.  And he had seen that shirt, unspeckled, lying on top of his opened suitcase, yesterday, in the bonny town of Edinburgh.

Could the speckles be …..

THE BLEEDINGS OF ANOTHER GARMENT, ONTO THE SHIRT?

Nope.  He had only one piece of red-colored clothing in his suitcase, which was (1) the wrong color and (2) had not been packed anywhere near the now-speckled shirt.

My son and I used the best parts of our inquiring brains, exploring different possibilities.

We were stumped.

So we decided to  reach out for help and consult with experts who might

  1. solve the mystery and/or
  2. save the shirt.

First, we spoke to the people at the front desk at the hotel.

The helpful woman at the front desk looked at the shirt and, like us, was mystified.  She immediately ruled out foul play by the hotel staff.  While cleaners had been in our room since the the last time the shirt had been seen unspeckled … all cleaning fluids at this hotel were colored clear, not red.

While she would have been happy to clean the shirt for us, all laundry had already gone out for the day. Waiting for the next pick-up would mean the shirt could not return in time to leave with us on our return passage to the United States.

What to do?

She sent us on our way to consult with other experts, a little ways down the street, who might be able to help:

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The two laundresses there inspected the shirt carefully, as we told them all we knew about The Speckled Shirt.  I watched as confusion, concern, and other emotions flickered across their fresh, young faces.

This must have been caused by some kind of spray!  Look at that pattern!

I suspect the cleaning staff at the hotel.  Even if their cleaning liquid aren’t red, this could definitely be a chemical reaction.

We would be happy to clean this for you, but I’m afraid we might not get these out.  Look at all of them!


Following the advice of these two laundry experts, we trudged back to the hotel, speckled shirt in tow. I recited, unemotionally, just the facts of what we had been told, in the tradition of another famous American detective.

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A manager was summarily called, who assured us the hotel would take care of the Speckled Shirt, in time for our departure, as best they could.

Wondering about all the confusing and conflicting evidence we had heard, recognizing we could not sort it all out, we put shirts and speckles out of our mind, and enjoyed another day in beautiful Edinburgh.

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Several hours later, after we returned to our hotel and got off the lift onto our floor, I was surprised to see, at that precise moment, a dapperly dressed gentleman rushing towards us, holding a hanger with a beautifully pressed shirt.

At first, of course, I leapt to this conclusion:

It’s the return of the shirt, speckled no longer!

However, this hope was quickly dashed by the gentleman moving swiftly by us and leaping onto the lift, apparently in pursuit of urgent business on other floors.

I said to my son, marveling at the coincidence. “Did you see that man?  There are other people in this hotel with Shirt Issues today.”

Minutes after we returned to our room, there came an urgent knock on the door.

As I opened the door, I discovered that same rushing man with shirt, now standing quite still. Said he,

Here is your shirt.  I had the wrong room number. My apologies.

And just like that, he was gone, leaving behind my son’s shirt, pressed and virtually speckle-free.

Let me ask you this, dear readers: Is that a mystery to you, that we did not recognize that shirt, rushing by us, as we left the lift?

Well,  I guess that speaks to many things, including the sometimes dubious nature of eyewitness testimony.

Now, as I bring this humble tale of The Speckled Shirt to an end, perhaps you may have noticed something else.

While the shirt was restored, with almost all tell-tale evidence removed ….

The mystery was never solved.

It now enters the realm of other unsolved mysteries I’ve experienced, including the first one I can remember.*

It’s difficult to tolerate the unknown, especially for important things.

In the meantime,  I will do my best, trying to solve mysteries and accepting that, for some, I may never know.

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Thanks to broox09, who posted that first “Unsolved Mystery” video on Youtube; detectives everywhere; the shows, books, movies, and people who have helped me get through some difficult times; and to you, for participating in this mystery today.

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* Who killed President John F. Kennedy?

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

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