Posts Tagged With: healing in groups

Day 2084: Second guessing

Almost exactly a year ago, I wrote Day 1714: Second guessing. So this is my second post about second guessing. I’m guessing it won’t be my last.

A few seconds before my therapy group started yesterday, one of the members tripped and fell. As the other group members witnessed spilled coffee, blood, and first responders in the hospital reacting to the situation, people were second guessing their own and others’ actions.

In the group (after the injured member had been tended to by expert personnel), we discussed the flight-fight-or-freeze response,  trauma, guilt, self-judgment,  doing too much, doing too little, What’s the right thing to do?, selfishness, selflessness, empathy, looking, intrusiveness, how time stretches out during emergencies, different perceptions, helping vs. getting out of the way,  and —  I’m guessing — dozens of variations on the theme of second guessing.

I am not second guessing the healing power of groups, especially in traumatic situations. I’m also not second guessing my photos from yesterday.

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In this second, I’m guessing that you — like the group members — want to know if the injured person is okay.  The person is fine.

This is the second time I’ve included the song “Second Guessing” by Jonny Lang.

I’m not second guessing my wish to include this second song, by The Guess Who.

 

Please don’t second guess anything you choose to share in a comment, below.

No second guessing about my gratitude for all who helped me create this second post about “Second Guessing” and — of course! — for YOU.

 

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , | 19 Comments

Day 2070: What’s your super power

Yesterday, I used my photographic super power to take a picture of this:

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What’s your super power?  Do you have more than one? Are you so super modest that it’s difficult to own your super powers?

Here’s a super incomplete list of my super powers:

  1. Taking pictures (see above).
  2. Blogging daily.
  3. Facilitating group healing.
  4. Coming up with new ideas.
  5. Finding cool socks.

I recently told a  super co-worker that helping a patient find a psychiatrist was NOT one of my super powers. I’m super secure that it’s super helpful to be aware and accepting of our super powers AND our limitations.

Speaking of limitations, I recently had the super idea that I stop using the super-judgmental  label “stupid” about myself or anybody else and use the superior word “limited” instead.

Do you see any super powers in my other super snapshots from yesterday?

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We think you deserve a treat, no matter what your super powers or limitations. I shall now attempt to find a super treat on YouTube for my super readers.

There’s a super number of videos on YouTube asking and perhaps answering the question, “What’s your super power?”  However, I’d rather share some super music like Super Stevie Wonder’s “Superstitious” and “Superwoman.”

I hope you use your super power of making comments, below.

It’s time to use my super power of expressing thanks to all those who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — YOU.  And I shall use my super powers to get back here as quickly as possible.

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Categories: cognitive behavioral therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 1872: Silver Linings

Yesterday, in a therapy group, we talked about silver linings, which are

the hopeful side of a situation that might seem gloomy on the surface. The common expression “every cloud has a silver lining” means that even the worst events or situations have some positive aspect.

The silver linings we talked about in group included the dark clouds of traumatic events which had made people stronger, more resilient, and grateful for the gifts of the present.

I found my own silver linings in that group:  I couldn’t write important themes up on the white board because of my torn rotator cuff so one of the group participants  wrote those lines instead, which meant

  • more group engagement and
  • better hand-writing.

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I was so pleased with these silver linings that I said,”Now I’m glad I hurt my arm.”  At first the group said, in unison, “No you’re not!” but that led to more valuable discussions about silver linings.

I want to underline this about silver linings:  I’m a person who can find a silver lining in my own painful injuries, but I can NOT find  silver linings in another horrific assault-weapon massacre in the U.S.  Maybe I can’t find silver linings there because nothing seems to disperse or lessen the  cloud of gun violence in the United States.

When my only child decided to go to the University of Edinburgh I easily found this silver lining:  no school shootings in Scotland.

What are your thoughts and feelings about silver linings?  Can you find any silver linings in my other photos?

 

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I have a silver lining of hope that people will change their thoughts and change the world .

There’s  a “Silver Lining” by Rilo Kiley on YouTube.

 

Here’s my silver lining of gratitude for all who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — for YOU.

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Categories: group psychotherapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 1771: Approval

I keep reading about “historically low” approval in the news.

In my work as a therapist, I try to help people improve low self approval. Improving low self approval often includes  group therapy, where people realize they are not alone in their unfairly harsh approval of themselves.

Self approval is often improved by

  • self care,
  • connecting,
  • sharing,
  • letting go of shame,
  • acceptance,
  • forgiveness,
  • honoring dreams,
  • identifying an achievable next step, and
  • giving oneself credit for progress, no matter how small.

What helps you improve your self approval?

I suspect there will be some approval of today’s photos.

 

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Is there approval for “Approval” by Brett Max?

 

My dreams include improved self approval for all who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — for YOU.  Thanks for your approval!

 

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 1740: Get Out

Get out!  I can’t believe that all my recent photos relate to the phrase “Get Out.”

 

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Those last two photos came out of a therapy group where people with histories of emotionally abusive relationships were brainstorming  how to get out  of old patterns and improve their lives.

What does “Get Out” mean to you?

You can get out to YouTube to hear “Get Out” by Lauryn Hill:

Now I need to get out to work and then get out to a performance of the musical Evita.

Did you think I’d forget to thank all the people who helped me create this post and you — of course! —  for reading it?  Get out!

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

Day 1670: Which way peace?

I have a peaceful way of choosing my post titles: I look at my pictures from the day before.

Yesterday, I facilitated a therapy group, listened, talked, walked, observed, and  settled in to our new home.  As always, there were ways to peace in every moment.

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Somebody in last night’s therapy group suggested that the way to peace was “forgiving self first.”

Which way is peace on YouTube?

Peace and thanks to all who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — to you, for finding your way here.

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments

Day 1655: Letting go

Is everybody ready for another post about letting go?

Before I say more about letting go, I’m not letting go of my habit of sharing links to my previous posts with similar titles (here, here, and here).   I am now letting go any judgment of the fact that all those previous “Letting Go” posts occurred during the first year of this living-non-judgmentally blog.

Now that I’ve let go of that, I want to tell you that yesterday’s  therapy group focused on “Letting Go.”

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I’m now letting go of my disappointment about my inability to include a blow-up of that white board, zooming in on the words “letting go” (in a different color, on the right). If you can’t find “letting go” amid all the red on that white board, let it go.

People in yesterday’s therapy group did an exercise in letting go by writing down words of things they wanted to let go. Here are some of the words I let go:

DOOM

GLOOM

DISASTER

JUDGMENT

HATE

UNWORTHY

SELFISH

FEAR

 

Since last fall, I’ve been letting go of negative reactions about

  1. my open heart surgery,
  2. the recall of my pacemaker/defibrillator, and
  3. the U.S. election.

Letting go takes a lot of work!

Now, I’m letting go of many things as we prepare for our move close to the ocean. Sister Thrift is a great place to let go of possessions for a wonderful cause.

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Now I’m letting go of all my other photos from yesterday.

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While I did let go of many CDs yesterday, I’m not letting go of any of the Compact Discs shown above.

Here‘s Bonnie Raitt singing an amazing song about letting go:

Feel free to let go of any thoughts and feelings about this post in a comment, below.

I’m now letting my gratitude — for all those who helped me create this post and for all those who are reading it — go out into the universe.

 

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 35 Comments

Day 1649: Forgiveness

Please forgive me, dear readers, for writing another post about forgiveness.

Last night’s therapy group was about forgiveness. I hope you can forgive my messy handwriting on the white board:

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Forgive me for asking: how would you answer those questions?

People last night had a lot to say about forgiveness. I said that I found it easier to forgive others than to forgive myself.  Here and now, I forgive myself for taking only one other photo yesterday.

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I wonder if the New Yorkers reading this post can forgive me for being a life-long Boston Red Sox fan.

Earlier this week, my therapist, George, suggested that I write down hurtful things  people have done to me so that I can work on really letting them go. I believe that George was talking to me about the healing power of forgiveness — of my self and of others.

Forgive me for including more than one tune about forgiveness (here and here on forgiving YouTube):

I’ll forgive you if you don’t leave a comment, but I might not forgive myself if I didn’t ask that you do.

Thanks to all who helped me create this post about forgiveness and — of course! — to you, for the forgiveness you bring.

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , | 35 Comments

Day 1635: Whatever it is, love it.

Whatever my daily blogging topic is, I love it.

Whatever my emotion is, I love it.

Whatever the day brings, I love it.

Whatever people say to me, I love it.

Whatever I see, I love it.

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Whatever irony there is, I love it.

Whatever I hear, I’m perfectly free to love it.

Whatever you think about this post, I love it.

Whatever gratitude I express to those who help me blog daily and — of course! — to you, my readers, I hope you love it.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 24 Comments

Day 1530: Obscure Sorrows

Earlier this year, I wrote a post referring to John Koenig‘s Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, which is “a compendium of invented words” “to give a name to emotions we all might experience but don’t yet have a word for.”

Yesterday, in my therapy group  (where  I’m always on the lookout for obscure sorrows and other feelings), one of the members brought in three entries from The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows.

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While some things in those photos might be obscure, people in the group last night noticed that two of those obscure words were real and only one — Altschmerz — really belongs in the Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows. People did not obscure their appreciation for the relevancy of the real word Weltschmerz:

Weltschmerz is the depressing feeling you get when comparing the actual state of the world to the picture in your head of how the world should be, and knowing that the picture in your head can never exist.

We also discussed the obscure sorrows created by the cognitive distortion of comparisons, especially when we compare ourselves to how we used to be or how we think we should be.

Do you see any obscure sorrows in some recent pictures in my head (and in my iPhone) that can exist in this blog?

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I feel self-compassion as I admit that I sometimes obscure sorrows with lots of pictures.

Here‘s John Koenig giving the TED talk “The conquest of new words” (which was in an link obscured in the first paragraph of this Obscure Sorrows post):

Are there any obscure sorrows or other feelings you’d like to share in a comment, below?

I will not obscure my thanks to all who helped me create this post and to you — of course! — no matter what obscure feelings or thoughts you’re having, here and now.

 

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 23 Comments

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