Posts Tagged With: Harvard Book Store

Day 1806: Sense AND Sensibility

Yesterday, I had the sense and sensibility to walk near the seashore with Michael, to visit the Harvard Book Store, AND to see an excellent production of Jane Austen‘s Sense and Sensibility  with my sensible friend, Deb.

When I was a senior in college, I had the sense and sensibility to write my undergraduate thesis on Jane Austen.  The title of that thesis was Judgment and [a word I don’t have the sensibility to remember, but my sense is that it’s something like “Perception”] in the Novels of Jane Austen. 

“Sense'” AND “sensibility” are defined in this quote from Wikipedia’s description of Jane Austen’s  novel Sense and Sensibility.

“Sense” means good judgment or prudence, and “sensibility” means sensitivity or emotionality.

Today, I would venture to say that combining one’s sense and sensibility results in wise mind — the overlap of logic and emotion.   I now have the sense and sensibility to quote Marsha Linehan, the creator of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT):

Wise mind is that part of each person that can know and experience truth. It is where the person knows something to be true or valid. It is almost always quiet, It has a certain peace. It is where the person knows something in a centered way.

Do you see any sense and/or sensibility in my photos from yesterday?

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I have the sense and sensibility to include this music from the 1995 film version of Sense and Sensibility:

As usual, I have the sense and sensibility to end a post with thanks to all who helped me create it and to you — of course! — for bringing your sense and sensibility to my blog.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

Day 922: Thumbs

Because my thumbs are sore this morning  —  from typing so much on my iPhone keyboard — I am focusing on sayings about thumbs, including:

  1. “Thumbs up” (meaning approval)
  2. “Thumbs down” (meaning a negative judgment)
  3. “All thumbs” (meaning clumsy), and
  4. “Stick out like a sore thumb” (which is what my first heart surgeon told my parents my first cardiac pacemaker would do, when I was 10 years old).

Pain makes things stick out like a sore thumb, so it’s no wonder my mind is thumbing through  thumb-related associations and memories.

My calves are sore too, today, but I can’t think of any sayings about calves. If you can, I certainly won’t thumb my nose at that.

Are there any thumbs in the photos I snapped yesterday, always using my left thumb?


No thumbs to be seen in that photo, but I am giving a big thumbs down to myself for leaving my car’s moonroof open during a night of rain.


Something’s up in that photo, but it’s not a thumb.

I can see several thumbs in that last photo. Can you?

No thumbs there.

See that guy, to the left, holding his thumb at his side? He’s wearing a New York Yankee shirt and hat, right next to Boston’s Fenway Park. Moments later, two Boston fans verbally thumbed their noses at him, with

“You’re in the wrong city, buddy.”


There he is again, after that thumbs down.

Speaking of thumbs down, that’s how I feel about one of my favorite Starbucks baristas, Kevin, leaving the Boston hospital where we both work.


Kevin is using his thumb to put the going-away card I just gave him into his apron pocket.


Thumbs up to Kevin for  going to another Starbucks closer to where he lives and thumbs up to Alex, for staying.

Personally, I give two thumbs up to these next two photos, from where I work:

Thumbs up or down to any of these photos I took after work?


  
  
  
That’s Tom, who said he’d give me a thumbs up if I contributed just $1 to a campaign to fight hunger.

Here’s Tom’s  reaction


… when I told him I’d thumbed over five times that amount.


There’s one of the nice guys who works where I park my car near Fenway Park. I gave him a thumbs up for putting my car near that door, so I could make a quick escape.

I always give two thumbs up to spending a Friday evening with my 17-year-old son Aaron and my 50-something-year-old boyfriend, Michael. Last night, I used my thumbs on the steering wheel of my cat* to drive us to Harvard Square in Cambridge. A big thumbs up to all the fun we had there.


  


  


  

After I used my thumbs to eat a “Longy School of Music” ( not pictured) and was all thumbs enough to spill some of that Smores Frappe (pictured) on myself, we went next door to the Harvard Book Store, where we thumbed through lots of books:


  
  
  

  
  
  
  
  
  
  

  

  

  
I bought one of those dozens of books, pictured above . A gigantic thumbs up to anybody who can guess which book that is.

What thumb-related music am I using for this all-thumbs post?

Here’s a hint:

It’s “Thumbelina” from the movie, Hans Christian Andersen!

My thumbs are too sore for me to give a proper thumbs up to all who helped me write this post, so I’ll just say


to them and to you, too!


* That’s a typo. I drove my car to Harvard Square, not my cat.

Categories: gratitude, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 58 Comments

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