Posts Tagged With: Hamilton

Day 2470: Permission

I hope I have my readers’s permission to start this post with a definition:

per·mis·sion
/pərˈmiSHən/
noun
consent; authorization.
“they had entered the country without permission”
synonyms: authorization, consent, leave, authority, sanction, license, dispensation, assent, acquiescence, agreement, approval, seal of approval, approbation, endorsement, blessing, imprimatur, clearance, acceptance, allowance, tolerance, sufferance, empowerment, freedom, liberty
an official document giving authorization.
plural noun: permissions
“permissions to reproduce copyright material”

I hope I have your permission to wonder this about that definition: Why are so many people so focused on others entering countries without permission? Is that REALLY the worst problem the world is facing?  Aren’t there other problems we should be erasing?

With or without permission, I’m going to state my position:  we are all occupants of this planet, dammit!  Why can’t we all come and go as we please, with more ease?

I know that if I were running for office in my home country with an attitude like that one, my quest for election would definitely be soon done.

Here’s my admission about why I’m focusing on permission:

IMG_8008.JPG

I took that photo without anybody’s permission.    That was my decision.

Here are some quotes about permission, in addition:

“Nobody can hurt me without my permission.”
Mahatma Gandhi

“When you give yourself permission to communicate what matters to you in every situation you will have peace despite rejection or disapproval. Putting a voice to your soul helps you to let go of the negative energy of fear and regret.”
Shannon L. Alder

“A strong gives forgiveness but weak gives permission.”
Santosh Kalwar, Quote Me Everyday

“The more people you have to ask for permission, the more dangerous a project gets.”
Alain de Botton

“When people change they do not ask your permission.”
Jennifer Pierre

“Quiet the noise around you; soften its pitch. Our deepest stories are our best teachers. Let the weapons of the weak — the poison, the nagging, the gossip — burn themselves to ash. Cast them to the wind. Take back the permission to succeed. Make it yours.”
Elissa Altman

“Stop looking for permission from other people to do what you know you are meant to do.”
― Adam Smith

“Do you really need permission? Still waiting for that invitation to your life? No one is going to give it to you…only you can do that.”
Jennifer Ho-Dougatz

“When we give ourselves permission to go wherever our outlandish thoughts take us, we feel that rush of creativity and excitement.”
 Teresa R. Funke, Bursts of Brilliance for a Creative Life blog

Without a permit, here are other photos I’ll submit:

IMG_7996

IMG_7997.JPG

IMG_8003

IMG_8004

IMG_8005

IMG_8007

You can give yourself permission, my dear,  to let go of future fear. Make a magic incantation without any hesitation.

Who gave me the permission to rhyme all this time?  It’s inspired  by listening to a rap musical sublime.

Whether Clark on Stage got permission to do this cover I don’t know. I’m still grateful that he gave it a go.

 

Whenever there’s a lot a stake, give yourself permission to take a break.

No matter what your position, you don’t need  permission to make a comment submission.

Thanks to all who help me create, including my readers, who are GREAT.

fullsizeoutput_3ce4

 

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism, quotes | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 2099: Look around, look around

As I look around, look around, I hear these lyrics from Hamilton:

Look around, look around,

How lucky we are to be alive right now.

Look around, look around, how lucky we are to be alive right now when somebody’s posted a 30-minute loop of these Hamilton lyrics on YouTube:

 

Look around, look around at my photos from yesterday.

IMG_0001

fullsizeoutput_3364

IMG_0003

IMG_0004

fullsizeoutput_3363

IMG_0006

fullsizeoutput_3365

IMG_0008

IMG_0009

IMG_0010

fullsizeoutput_3367

IMG_0014

IMG_0013

fullsizeoutput_3366

IMG_0018

IMG_0017

 

How lucky I am to be alive right now, even if I lose sight of that sometimes.

What do you see when you look around, look around? I will look around, look around for your comments later.

Look around, look around for my gratitude to all who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — to YOU, for looking around, looking around here.

 

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 26 Comments

Day 2092: What’s in the details?

Some people say “The devil is in the details.”

Others say “God is in the details.”

Oprah has said, “Love is in the details.”

I have said, “Details, details!” and have written Day 1988: It’s all in the details.

What’s in the details of my photos from yesterday?

IMG_3375

 

IMG_3381

IMG_3411

IMG_3409

IMG_3412

IMG_3414

IMG_3413

IMG_3415

IMG_3416

 

 

Here’s a detail about my creating my daily blog posts: I often  spend a devil of a time on the details of my photo layouts.

My friend Deb noticed a detail in this sign at the Opera House yesterday:

IMG_3417

Because we were at a matinee of Hamilton,  which was during the day, the restrictions about “tonight’s performance” did not apply.  However, if we had used our cell phones, photographed, or recorded, there would have been the devil to pay.

Here’s a detail about yesterday’s performance: when Hamilton and Lafayette sang “Immigrants — we get the job done!” the audience cheered.

When I look to YouTube for examples of that line, the details on many videos of Hamilton‘s” Yorktown”  indicate that copyrights might prevent them from lasting in this post. I think the angels of  the internet might allow these to stay (here and here on YouTube).

I look forward to the details in your comments.

Detailed thanks to all who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — to YOU.

fullsizeoutput_3337

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 2091: Open with care

When I open, with care,  every new blog post, I also open, with care, my photo app.

Today I care to open with this photo:

IMG_3338

I open my car door with care and I also open with care other things, including:

  • My mind.
  • My heart.
  • My mouth.
  • My eyes.
  • Every blog post.
  • Therapy groups.
  • Meetings.
  • Communication.
  • Presents.
  • Books.
  • Conversations.
  • Songs.
  • Poems.
  • Emails.
  • Packaging.
  • My laptop.

What do you open with care?

I shall now re-open my photo app with care.

IMG_3363

IMG_3366

fullsizeoutput_332f

fullsizeoutput_3331

fullsizeoutput_332e

IMG_3373

IMG_3370

IMG_3361

IMG_3360

IMG_3362

IMG_3354

IMG_3355

IMG_3348

fullsizeoutput_3332

IMG_3371

IMG_3364

“I’m not anti-social” (displayed with care on those socks, above) is an interesting way to open a conversation.

Note that I opened my list of favorite movies with “Singin’ in the Rain.”  I’ve opened up, here, about how much I love musicals. Today, I opened my eyes and thought, “I’m seeing Hamilton today!!!”

I now open YouTube with care, looking for relevant music to share.

Later today, I shall open WordPress with care to see how people open their comments.

I open each blog post with care and close it with gratitude, so thanks to all who helped me create this open-with-care post and — of course! — YOU.

IMG_3372

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Day 1539: The No List

No. 1.   Here’s The No List that inspired this post:

IMG_9523

No. 2.  The No List on that napkin holder included

  • No high fructose corn syrup,
  • No hydrogenated fats,
  • No added growth hormones in our fresh meat,
  • No artificial preservatives,
  • No artificial sweeteners.

No. 3.   The No List at Whole Foods ended with this:
IMG_9524

No. 4.  My personal No List includes

  • No bullies.
  • No cruelty.
  • No sexism.
  • No racism.
  • No homophobia.
  • No ageism.
  • No regrets about saying “No” in the past.

No. 5.  Here’s a list of quotes about No:

No is a complete sentence and so often we forget that.
When we don’t want to do something we can simply smile and say no.
We don’t have to explain ourselves, we can just say “No”.
Early on my journey I found developing the ability to say no expanded my ability to say yes and really mean it.
My early attempts at saying no were often far from graceful but with practice even my no came from a place of love.
Love yourself enough to be able to say yes or no.”
― Susan Gregg

“Let today mark a new beginning for you. Give yourself permission to say NO without feeling guilty, mean, or selfish. Anybody who gets upset and/or expects you to say YES all of the time clearly doesn’t have your best interest at heart. Always remember: You have a right to say NO without having to explain yourself. Be at peace with your decisions.”
― Stephanie Lahart

“Say no to everything, so you can say yes to the one thing.”
― Richie Norton

“Most women are all too familiar with men like Calvin Smith. Men whose sense of prerogative renders them deaf when women say, “No thanks,” “Not interested,” or even “Fuck off, creep.”
― Jon Krakauer, Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town

“Whether they’re family or friends, manipulators are difficult to escape from. Give in to their demands and they’ll be happy enough, but if you develop a spine and start saying no, it will inevitably bring a fresh round of head games and emotional blackmail. You’ll notice that breaking free from someone else’s dominance will often result in them accusing you of being selfish. Yes, you’re selfish, because you’ve stopped doing what they want you to do for them. Wow. Can these people hear themselves?!”
― Rosie Blythe, The Princess Guide to Life

“It takes effort to say no when our heart and brains and guts and, most important, pride are yearning to say yes. Practice.”
― Cole Harmonson, Pre Middle Age: 40 Lessons in Growing the Hell Up

“He wasn’t used to people saying no, and Eby felt sorry for him, the way she’d always felt sorry for those who had everything and it still wasn’t enough.”
― Sarah Addison Allen, Lost Lake

“Information overload (on all levels) is exactly WHY you need an “ignore list”. It has never been more important to be able to say “No”
― Mani S. Sivasubramanian, How To Focus – Stop Procrastinating, Improve Your Concentration & Get Things Done – Easily!

“We must say “no” to what, in our heart, we don’t want. We must say “no” to doing things out of obligation, thereby cheating those important to us of the purest expression of our love. We must say “no” to treating ourselves, our health, our needs as not as important as someone else’s. We must say “no.”
― Suzette Hinton

“To exist here, I’ll have to become skilled in saying no—an art in which I was once well accomplished, but one I no longer care to practice.”
― Doug Cooper, Outside In

“It is extremely important to be able to make negative assertions. We must be able to say what is ‘not me’ in order to have a ‘me’. What we like has no meaning unless we know what we don’t like. Our yes has no meaning if we never say no. My chosen profession has no passion if ‘just anyone would do’. Our opinions and thoughts mean very little if there is nothing we disagree with.”
― Henry Cloud, Changes That Heal: How to Understand the Past to Ensure a Healthier Future

“If the person you’re talking with continues to press you for more or can’t seem to accept your answer, then you are being harassed. I know that sounds hard for people-pleasers to accept, but it’s true. No means no.”
― Suzette Hinton

“Many survivors have such profound deficiencies in self-protection that they can barely imagine themselves in a position of agency or choice. The idea of saying no to the emotional demands of a parent, spouse, lover or authority figure may be practically inconceivable. Thus, it is not uncommon to find adult survivors who continue to minister to the needs of those who once abused them and who continue to permit major intrusions without boundaries or limits. Adult survivors may nurse their abusers in illness, defend them in adversity, and even, in extreme cases, continue to submit to their sexual demands.”
― Judith Lewis Herman, Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence – From Domestic Abuse to Political Terror

“If something is not a “hell, YEAH!”, then it’s a “no!”
― James Altucher

“Sometimes “No” is the kindest word.”
― Vironika Tugaleva

“Learn to say “no” to the good and the advantageous, in order to receive the best.”
― Sunday Adelaja

“In order for us to practice self-control, we must have a goal. We must have something we are saying “yes” to, which necessarily comes with things that we must say “no” to. We use self-control to maneuver ourselves toward this “yes.” This goal must be entirely our own. The minute another person is choosing and managing our goals for us, we have left self-control behind.”
― Danny Silk, Keep Your Love On: Connection Communication And Boundaries.

“When you say no to the wrong people, it opens up the space for the right people to come in.”

― Joe Calloway, Magnetic: The Art of Attracting Business

“Until you learn how to confidently say NO to so many things, you shall always say YES to so many things. The real summary of a regretful life is a life that failed to balance YES and NO. Yes! A life that failed to recognize when to courageously say NO and when to confidently say YES!”
― Ernest Agyemang Yeboah

“NO” is a complete sentence. It does not require an explanation to follow. You can truly answer someone’s request with a simple No.”
― Sharon E. Rainey, The Best Part of My Day Healing Journal

No. 6.   Heres “Say No to This” from Hamilton. 

No. 7.  Too-expensive tickets to Hamilton have been on my No List, so I’ve said “yes” to just singing along to the soundtrack.

No. 8.  Did you know I said yes to more photos yesterday?

IMG_9526.JPG

IMG_9525

IMG_9527

IMG_9534

No. 9. Because not sharing is not caring, sharing gratitude is never on my No List.

IMG_9532

IMG_9533

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism, self-care | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 49 Comments

Day 1508: A quiet home

Yesterday, I returned to the quiet home of my EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) therapist George after a long, disquieting absence. George and I talked quietly about how difficult it’s been for me to find a quiet home after the multiple traumas of open heart surgery, my pacemaker getting recalled, complications with the pacemaker replacement surgery, all the noise around the U.S. election, the loudness of my mechanical heart valve at night, and the fear and discomfort I’ve been experiencing internally and externally. During my quiet time with George, I realized I could create a quiet home wherever I am, by focusing on whatever helps quiet my mind and my soul.

Soon after that quieting session, I saw this:

img_8875

I’d love a quiet home, too.  How about you?

Can you see any quiet homes in my other photos from yesterday?

img_8856

img_8857

 

img_8858

img_8860

 

img_8863

img_8862

img_8864

IMG_8865.JPG

img_8866

img_8867

img_8868

img_8873

img_8876

 

img_8878

img_8877

img_8882

img_8883

img_8880

img_8881

img_8884

While I was looking through windows of hope for quiet homes yesterday, I quietly heard this quiet music from Hamilton:

 

Thanks to all who helped me create  this quiet home today and to you — of course! — wherever your quiet homes are.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 29 Comments

Day 1507: What did I miss?

Whenever I run a therapy group and list the themes I’m hearing in the room, I always ask the group members:

What did I miss?

I never miss asking that question because, as I tell the group, I always miss something.

What did I miss, yesterday, when I was taking pictures?

img_8842

img_8843

IMG_8844.JPG

img_8845

img_8846

 

img_8848

img_8847

img_8849

img_8850

img_8851

img_8852

img_8854

img_8853

What did I miss?

I almost missed sharing music not to be missed.

What did you miss in this blog post? Please don’t miss leaving a comment for this Blogging Miss.

I never miss expressing my thanks to all who help me create the day’s blog post and — of course! — to YOU.

 

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 24 Comments

Day 1391: Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story

To start telling this story, today’s post title is a quote from the musical Hamilton.

 

Who lives, on the day I’m writing this?

  • I do, against all odds and even though a team of doctors at the Mayo Clinic  essentially killed me* on September 21 in order to repair my heart before they brought me back to life.
  • Mel Brooks, thank goodness, even though he is 90 years old (and whom I’ll be seeing today in person in Boston).
  • Approximately 7.5 billion people, according to this link.

 

Who dies, on the day I’m writing this?

  • Kevin Meaney, suddenly at age 60, who was one of my and my son’s favorite comedians.
  • 151,600 people, according to this link.

 

Who tells your story?

I’ll tell you who tells my story —   it’s me, through this blog.  Perhaps because my story has included so many doctors and medical institutions from the moment I was born, it’s VERY important to me to be the expert of my own experience — the primary teller of my own story. Of course, I can’t control how others will tell my story after I die, but to quote Kevin Meaney about that, “I don’t care.”

Here’s how I photographically choose to tell my story of October 21, 2016, when I went to  one hospital for cardiac rehab and then to another hospital to get blood work to prepare for ANOTHER surgical procedure on November 2 and also to drop in on my  amazing cardiologist Dr. Deeb Salem:

img_5990

img_5991

img_5992

 

img_5996

img_5997

img_5998

img_6001

img_2593

img_2594

img_2595

img_2596

And because we do need help from others to tell our stories, I want to thank my friend Carol, who is such a wonderful woman, for capturing the story of those last four photos.

Here’s the last photo that I took yesterday, to tell my story:

img_6011

Now, how would you tell a story in a comment, below?

I’ll end today’s story with live gratitude to all those living and dead who helped me create this post and to you — of course! — no matter how you tell your story.


* I’m glad you lived to read  this part of my story from the Mayo Clinic surgeon’s report on  September 21:  “The aorta was occluded, and 800 cc of cold blood cardioplegia was infused into the aortic root obtaining satisfactory asystolic arrest.” Doesn’t that sound like they satisfactorily killed me?

Categories: heart condition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 1356: Important

Yesterday, while I was waiting for an important appointment at an important Boston hospital, I saw this important book:

IMG_5233.JPG

img_5234

After I saw that important book, I saw my important cardiologist Dr. Deeb Salem, who thought it important to tell me about two important people fainting when observing open heart surgery. It’s probably important for me to share now that I’m having important open heart surgery in four days at the important Mayo Clinic in important Rochester, Minnesota. That surgery is so important to me that I asked for an important hug from the important Dr. Salem yesterday for the first time in our important 34-year doctor/patient relationship. I also told Dr. Salem that I’m so important to his important colleague and fellow cardiologist Dr. Mark Estes that Dr. Estes had promised to importantly greet me with his important medical team at Boston’s important airport when I return in two weeks from my important surgery.

Then I went back to my important job at another important Boston hospital, where many important people wished me well.

Here are more of my important shots from yesterday:

img_5236

img_5237

img_5243

img_5244

img_5245

img_5246

img_5248

img_5250

img_5253

IMG_5251.JPG

img_5252

img_5254

img_5256

img_5257

img_5259

img_5261

img_5255

img_5262

img_5263

img_5268

img_5269

img_5265

img_5267

img_5230

It’s important to note that those last two important shots include important lyrics from the important musical, Hamilton. Here‘s the important Hamilton number “(I Am Not Throwing Away) My Shot.”

Another important fact in today’s important post: last night I gave myself my first important injection of twice-daily anti-coagulant before my important surgery …

img_5270

… and then I threw away my shot.

What’s important, here and now, to you?

Gratitude is important to me, so ….

img_5232

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 26 Comments

Day 1321: I strongly recommend

In my life, I have encountered many strong recommendations.

These strong recommendations have included the following:

I strongly recommend you get a third litter box for your two cats.

I strongly recommend you bring Oscar to a cat eye specialist because when I look in his eyes, I can’t see the back of his eyes.

I strongly recommend you make an appointment with our cat ophthamologist before you go away on vacation, because she books up way in advance.

I strongly recommend you do not send in financial statements when applying for a student visa.

I strongly recommend you make an appointment for the one-day super priority visa service as soon as possible.

I strongly recommend you use a professional visa service company to help Aaron get his visa.

I strongly recommend  you don’t worry about Aaron getting a student visa in time to start his studies at University of Edinburgh in September.

I strongly recommend you bring your Lasix pills with you to Scotland, in case you eat food that has too much salt.

I strongly recommend that you wear a mask on the plane, since you recently had pneumonia.

I strongly recommend that you choose a more comfortable mask.

I strongly recommend you forget about work when you’re away on vacation.

I strongly recommend that you have heart valve replacement surgery as soon as possible, despite all the conflicting recommendations you’ve gotten from other doctors.

I strongly recommend that you notice that some of those recent strong recommendations contradict other strong recommendations.

I strongly recommend that when people make strong recommendations conflicting with other recommendations or with your own intuition and experience, that you get other recommendations until you feel comfortable.

I strongly recommend that you look at my photos from yesterday:

IMG_4013

IMG_4014

IMG_4015

IMG_4016

IMG_4018

IMG_4021

IMG_4022

IMG_4023

IMG_4024.JPG

IMG_4026.JPG

IMG_4027

IMG_4028

IMG_4029

IMG_4030

IMG_4031

IMG_4032

IMG_4034

IMG_4033

I strongly recommend that if you want explanations for any of those photos, that you ask.

I strongly recommend that people listen to the musical Hamilton, because it is awesome.

 

I  also strongly recommend that everybody balance your needs with other people’s needs, putting your needs somewhat higher.

I strongly recommend that you leave a comment, but only if you feel comfortable.

I strongly recommend gratitude as a great way to end anything, including this post.  So thanks to all who helped me create it and to you — of course! — for reading  it.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 47 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.