Posts Tagged With: group therapy exercise

Day 2013: Object

I object to my primary blogging tool — my laptop computer — turning into a useless object.

I hope you don’t object to my sharing a definition in a new way, by taking a screenshot on my phone:

Because I was aware of my useless laptop as an object yesterday, I took many photos of other objects. I thought the object of today’s post was going to be “Still Life” — allowing me to make this pun: “Even though my laptop is dead, there’s still life in me and in my blog.”

I hope you don’t object to my calling today’s post “Object” instead. Here were the objects of my attention yesterday:

Last night in a therapy group, nobody objected to exploring the topic “What I Say/What I Don’t Say.”

Here‘s “The Annoyed Objects” by DeStorm Power:

I look forward to the objects of your comments, below.

You are all now the object of my gratitude. (I assume you do not object to being that kind of object.)

Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism, therapy | Tags: , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Day 1977: Other people’s opinions

Yesterday, in a therapy group, people discussed  and wrote down their thoughts and feelings about other people’s opinions.

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What is your personal experience of other people’s opinions?  What makes other people’s opinions more difficult for you? What helps you deal with other people’s opinions?

In yesterday’s group, I shared a personal experience of other people’s opinions, which I’ve written about previously (here). At the end of a weekend-long retreat, decades ago, I participated in an exercise where everybody got to give and receive opinions about each other.  The people who were running the exercise offered this excellent opinion: When people give you their opinions about you, they are often talking about themselves.  However, if you hear similar opinions from different people, you need to take those opinions seriously.  At that retreat, I was surprised …

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… to hear mostly positive and supportive opinions.

After group yesterday, I swapped opinions with author and friend Chris, who was my student at Boston University decades ago (and who has appeared in other blogs posts, here, herehere, and here).

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That’s Chris taking a photo of the street sign at Fenway Park that was recently changed from Yawkey Way back to its original name — Jersey Street — because of other people’s opinions.

I sang my first original song — “I Don’t Like You” —  for Chris, and his opinion matched other people’s opinions. When I told him I was going to debut that song at an Open Mic tomorrow night and also share that performance on YouTube, his opinion was very supportive.  I have very positive opinions of Chris and I’m sure other people share those opinions.

I’m wondering, here and now, about other people’s opinions of this post, including all my other photos from yesterday …

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… and the music I’m choosing for today’s post.

On YouTube, other people’s opinions of Jake Shimabukuro playing the ukulele are similar to mine.

I look forward to other people’s opinions, below.

My opinion is that you should express gratitude to others whenever you can, like now!

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 1955: For Safety

As a psychotherapist, I’m concerned about people’s safety.

I work at a Boston hospital, where others also look out for your safety.

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For our safety, I wish world leaders would use the negotiating table.

For my safety, I observe what’s going on around me, like this:

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For our safety and sanity, we’re using our seaside table.

Here’s an old advertisement for safety  I safely remember.

What do you do for safety?

Appreciation and gratitude increase my sense of safety,  so thanks to all who helped me create today’s post for safety  and — of course! — thanks to you.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 1930: Lucky to be different

Yesterday was lucky to be different in several ways:

  • It was Friday the 13th.
  • Vivian the social work intern showed me her Lucky to Be Different socks.

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  • Vivian and I were lucky to facilitate a therapy group where different people discussed how lack or loss of control affects them.

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  • I was lucky to find different images  throughout the day.

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It’s lucky to be different around here.

It’s lucky that there are different versions of “Get Lucky” on YouTube (herehere, and here).

Do you think it’s lucky to be different?

I’m lucky to get different comments every day.

It’s lucky to be different, here and now, expressing thanks to all who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — to YOU.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 23 Comments

Day 1926: Taking steps

Yesterday, I started taking steps for a fitness challenge where I work.  I’ve committed to taking at least 10,000 steps every day for the next month.

While I was taking steps yesterday, I was also taking pictures. Now I am taking steps to share those photos.

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After taking more than 3,000 steps to get to my office, I took the step to indicate my mood on my new feeling chart.  If you take a few blogging steps back, you’ll see here (in the post Day 1923: Accepting all feelings) that the feeling chart is something people created in a therapy group last week. On Monday morning,  after taking all those steps, I was feeling hope.

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After taking about 1,000 more steps at work, I took the step of completing a required online training  — “Security Smart: Keeping Yourself Safe in the Workplace — which included taking steps to deescalate when people are upset.

After taking steps to help many people with many problems (while taking approximately 2,000 more steps around the hospital), I took a step at the end of the day to temporarily change my mood chart.

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I believe that taking steps to express and share feelings helps to deescalate those feelings.

After my long work day, I took 3,000 more steps to walk back to my car. At about 9 PM while I was taking steps at home, I reached my daily goal of taking 10,000 steps!

While I was taking steps yesterday, I heard “Steppin’ Out” sung by Kurt Elling.

 

Today, I’ll be taking steps to

  • go to work,
  • provide individual and group therapy at the Primary Care Practice of a Boston hospital,
  • treat people with respect,
  • listen to music I love, and
  • gather photos for tomorrow’s blog.

If you’d like to take steps to leave a comment, please step down below this blog.

As always, I’m taking steps to express my gratitude to all who help me take the necessary steps to create this daily blog, including YOU.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 1923: Accepting all feelings

653 days ago (but who’s counting?) I wrote a post titled “Accepting all feelings” wherein I described feelings I was having about open heart surgery.  Yesterday morning, I had many feelings when I kept screwing up my  INR blood test because I was rushing to get to Physical Therapy for my injured shoulder. After my INR home monitor had rejected my THIRD attempt to test a blood sample,  I had so many bad feelings that I lost it.

As I was F-bombing my way around our home, I woke up Michael, who heard this exchange.

Me: F — all of this!  I can’t stand it any more!

Oscar:  Meow!

Me: F— you, Oscar!

Michael thought I had finally lost it because of my feelings about Oscar. And I do have feelings when Oscar sleeps on my injured shoulder, walks and sits on my laptop when I’m trying to blog (like now), gives me love bites (like now), and almost trips me every day when I’m going down the stairs and trying to get out of the house on time. However, I accept that Oscar does these things because he wants to be close to me, which is usually a good feeling.

After I made it to Physical Therapy on time, got help from people at work in capturing an adequate blood sample, and discovered that my INR reading was okay,  it was easier to accept my feelings because they were better.

Soon after that, I facilitated a therapy group where people talked about lots of feelings. I suggested that people work on accepting all feelings by writing down their feelings and illustrating them.

I accept all feelings about my photos from yesterday.

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Here’s what I found on YouTube about “accepting all feelings.”

Watching the ocean definitely helps me accept all feelings.

I hope you accept all my feelings of gratitude, here and now.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 28 Comments

Day 1920: What’s bad for you? What’s good for you?

Yesterday, in a therapy group, people made lists of what’s bad for them and what’s good for them.

What would you put in your lists of what’s bad for you and what’s good for you?

Do you see anything that’s  bad for you or good for you in my photos?

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Here‘s a Good AND Bad Song from The Powerpuff Girls.

 

It would be bad for me to miss my 7:30 AM Physical Therapy appointment, so it’s good for me to end now with thanks to all who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — to YOU.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Day 1907: A grain of salt

People I love keep telling me to take things with a grain of salt, even though I should be restricting my salt intake.

If you don’t know the meaning of the idiom “a grain of salt,” take this!

“(With) a grain of salt”, (or “a pinch of salt”) is an idiom of the English language, which means to view something with skepticism or not to interpret something literally.

In a pinch, here are more grains of wisdom from that Wikipedia page:

Hypotheses of the phrase’s origin include Pliny the Elder‘s Naturalis Historia, regarding the discovery of a recipe for an antidote to a poison.[2] In the antidote, one of the ingredients was a grain of salt. Threats involving the poison were thus to be taken “with a grain of salt”, and therefore less seriously.

The phrase cum grano salis (“with a grain of salt”) is not what Pliny wrote. It is constructed according to the grammar of modern European languages rather than Classical Latin. Pliny’s actual words were addito salis grano (“after having added a grain of salt”).

An alternative account says that the Roman general Pompey believed he could make himself immune to poison by ingesting small amounts of various poisons, and he took this treatment with a grain of salt to help him swallow the poison. In this version, the salt is not the antidote. It was taken merely to assist in swallowing the poison.

The Latin word salis means both “salt” and “wit”, so that the Latin phrase “cum grano salis” could be translated as both “with a grain of salt” and “with a grain (small amount) of wit”. The phrase is said “with a pinch of salt” in British English and said “with a grain of salt” in American English.

 

These days, we could all use grains of wit, salt, and other antidotes to poisons.

Lately, I’ve been encouraged to take gloomier forecasts about my rotator cuff injury with  grains of salt. Those grains of salt are more helpful than rubbing salt in that wound.

Also, I should have taken yesterday’s forecasts about a “four-easter” in Boston with a grain of salt. I woke up early to find very little snow on the ground, which means fewer grains of salt on the highways and byways today.

Michael, who sometimes tells me to take things with a BIG grain of salt, just said, “I don’t think there’s going to be anything to shovel, baby. If you need any help with your car, wake me up.”

What do you take with a grain (or a pinch)  of salt?  Any of these photos?

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You may take this with a grain of salt, but I think New England ducks have fun in the salt water.

There are at least three “Grain of Salt” songs on YouTube (here,  here, and here).

I look forward to the grains of comments about today’s post.

Grainy thanks to all who helped me write today’s salty post and — of course! — to YOU.

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

Day 1902: What I Know/What I Don’t Know

What I know, here and now, includes the following:

What I don’t know, here and now, includes the following:

  • What you might put on your lists of what you know and what you don’t know.
  • Why I’m avoiding doing my taxes.
  • Whether I’m going to sing new lyrics I wrote to “Mack the Knife” about my Coping and Healing groups at work next week.
  • Who is going to be the next President of the United States.
  • How you might react to my photos from yesterday.

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I know that Bugles have way too much saturated fat but I didn’t know they were America’s #1 finger hat.  Now I know.

I know I love this Stephen Sondheim song (which you may or may not know from a six-month-old blog post).

Today I could choose to see a Stephen Sondheim musical at a local university and/or work on my taxes.  I don’t know what I’m going to do.

I know this:  I could do both. I’ll let you know tomorrow.

I don’t know what I would do without the people who help me write this blog.  I know I appreciate all of them, including YOU.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

Day 1893: Up the wall

Yesterday, I was told to meet my physical therapist by following some feet on the floor. I followed those feet out of the waiting room, through a door, and past small and large treatment rooms, but  I wasn’t sure what to do when the feet went up the wall.

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Not knowing where to go can send me up the wall and so can

  • cell phones,
  • injuries,
  • physical pain,
  • emotional pain,
  • injustice,
  • meanness,
  • thoughtlessness, and
  • people consistently misspelling my name.

 

What sends you up the wall? Does it send you up the wall that I haven’t defined my terms?

send someone up the wall

Fig. to annoy and irritate someone; to drive someone crazy. Don’t scratch your 
fingers on the  blackboard. It sends me up the wall! 
That noise sends me up the wall!

Do any of my photos from yesterday send you up the wall?

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Personally, love and acceptance don’t send me up the wall. They  send me over the moon.

When working in high tech sent me up the wall in the 1980’s,  I would sometimes dance to this:

Please don’t write your comments up on the wall; instead, write them down below.

Over-the-moon thanks to all who helped me create this up-the-wall post and — of course! — to YOU.

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Categories: definition, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

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