Posts Tagged With: Fred Astaire

Day 2941: Comebacks

I always appreciate it when you come back to this blog, which today will start out with a definition of “comeback.”

come·back /ˈkəmˌbak/

noun
1. a return by a well-known person, especially an entertainer or sports player, to the activity in which they have formerly been successful.
“the heavyweight champion is set to make his comeback”
Similar: resurgence, recovery, return, rally, upturn, revival, rebound, fightback
2. INFORMAL
a quick reply to a critical remark.
“some of my best comebacks just go right over people’s heads”

I’m looking forward to tomorrow’s comeback of many well-known politicians to the activities in which they have formerly been successful. I’m also looking forward to the comeback of my country to the world stage.

Also, since I was very young, I’ve been known for my comebacks. Once, when a young man was telling me how wonderful he was and said, “You can call me God, for short,” I had this comeback: “Short for what — Godawful?”

Now it’s time to come back to my most recent images. Do you see any comebacks in them?

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Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire have had many comebacks, as you can see here:

I look forward to your comebacks in the comment section, below.

Thanks to all who come back to this blog, including YOU.

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, politics | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 2760: They can’t take that away

Today is our beloved kitty Oscar’s last day on earth.  We have scheduled a “peaceful passing” for him today at 5 PM; it’s unclear whether he will make it to then.  Either way, we know it’s the right decision to let him go.

Many thanks to all my readers for helping us through this painful process.

Last night while spending time with Oscar, who can barely walk and has stopped eating entirely,  I rewrote the lyrics to my favorite song  — “They Can’t Take That Away From Me.”

The way you ate your meal,
The way you meowed off key.
The way you made us feel,
No, no, they can’t take that away from me.

The way you took cat naps,
The way you watched TV.
The way you graced our laps,
No, no, they can’t take that away from me.

We may never, never meet again on this earthly road of love,
But there’ll always always be the memory of

The way you were our cat
The best a cat could be,
The memory of all that
No, no they can’t take that away from me.

No, they can’t take that away from me.

The night before last,  Oscar was gracing my lap as we watched  Fred Astaire  and Ginger Rogers take dancing and singing to a new level with   “They Can’t Take That Away From Me” in the great Rogers-Astaire reunion movie The Barkleys of Broadway.

I wonder how many takes it took to capture that perfect performance.

They can’t take away this memorable comment about that YouTube video:

Daniel Bradford
3 years ago
No matter what happens, they can’t take away your memories.

No matter what happens, they can’t take away the memories of Oscar in this blog and in Oscar’s Facebook page, found here. And they can’t take away the nice comment left yesterday on Oscar’s Facebook page by the veterinarian who consulted with us last night about Oscar’s quality of life.

They can’t take away these photos from yesterday:

They can’t take away any of those memories.

They can’t take away my gratitude for everything, including Oscar and YOU.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , | 51 Comments

Day 2746: Does worry help?

“Does worry help?” is a question I have asked many, many (and don’t worry how many) people, over the years.

What’s your first guess, best guess about the answer?

Don’t worry, I’ll tell you answer. It’s a resounding NO.

Yesterday, people discussed the difference between worry and planning AND the difference between worry and caring.

Despite our confusion about those concepts, it is very possible to plan without worry and to care without worry, although separating those out takes work.

Does it help to worry about Oscar during his last days?

No, but it helps to plan and to care.

Does it help to worry about any of my photos here today?

Does it help to worry about procrastination or instant gratification? Coincidentally, last night my son and my husband were discussing the benefits of procrastination. Aaron said that procrastination involves getting a lot of other things done while you’re procrastinating. Also, procrastination makes you work efficiently, because you’re doing things quickly at the last minute.

Am I worried about my son? No.

Does worry help as I look for a dance number from Top Hat, which Oscar and I watched yesterday?

Does it help to worry about the weather? Not according to Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire.

Does gratitude help? Always.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 2681: Traceability

Traceability (according to this traceable point on the internet) is

The ability to trace (identify and measure) all the stages that led to a particular point in a process that consists of a chain of interrelated events.

Let’s see if we have the ability to trace (identify and measure) all the stages that led to this particular title in a process that consists of a chain of interrelated blog posts.

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That’s it.  Today’s blog post title is traceable to that sign in a Whole Food Market, which I saw yesterday when Michael and I were doing our weekly food shopping.

After we shopped, removed our masks, and got into my traceably bright yellow car, Michael said, “That was stressful.  I used to enjoy food shopping.”   Michael’s comment has traceability — we are in a particular point in a process of a chain of interrelated pandemic events.

Do you see traceability in my other photos from yesterday?

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My choice of video today has traceability back to my watching  Royal Wedding with Fred Astaire and Jane Powell yesterday.

Fred Astaire’s character dancing on the walls and ceiling has traceability from Sarah Churchill‘s character revealing earlier in Royal Wedding that she used to imagine she could dance all over the floors, walls and  “even the ceiling” when she was a child. Sarah Churchill’s lineage has traceability to her father, Winston Churchill.

So much traceability, so little time.

Today’s thanks — to everybody who helps me blog every day, (including YOU) —  have traceability to yesterday’s visit to Whole Foods, too.

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Categories: definition, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Day 1375: Band wagon

Time to join the band wagon of Ann’s readers, who are used to seeing her begin posts by defining phrases like “band wagon.”

band·wag·on
ˈbandˌwaɡən/
noun
1. a wagon used for carrying a band in a parade or procession.
2. a particular activity or cause that has suddenly become fashionable or popular.
“the local deejays are on the home-team bandwagon”

I had a recent experience with definition #1, when one of my  Boston cardiologists offered to pick up me and my boyfriend Michael at Boston’s Logan Airport in a band wagon, no matter when  we returned home after my September 21 open heart surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota.  However, I foiled that band wagon by returning late at night and way before anybody expected me to —  six days after my heart valve replacement surgery.

By the way, I just noticed that WordPress is suggesting I invite my readers to join a band wagon (definition #2) by including this message at the top of post-creation page:

Encourage your US-based users to register to vote by adding a subtle prompt to your site.

If you were in my band wagon  of classic American movie musical fans, you might add a third definition of “band wagon,” like so:

3. the most intelligent AND fun American movie musical ever made starring Fred Astaire (as opposed the most intelligent AND fun American movie musical ever made starring Gene Kelly, which is Singin’ in the Rain).

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Because I like to join band wagons of people recovering from a traumatic event like surgery who treat themselves exceedingly well, I watched the beginning of The Band Wagon yesterday morning, which included these two musical numbers (here and here on YouTube):

No  matter what is going on in my life, that second number from The Band Wagon puts a melody in my heart, gives me a singable happy feeling AND a wonderful way to start my day.

Now, would you like to join the band wagon of Ann’s readers who enjoy looking at  images captured on her iPhone from the day before?

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Those last two photos feature Dr. Deeb Salem, one of my band wagon of cardiologists (but not the one who offered to pick us up in a band wagon at the airport).  In the first photograph, Dr. Salem  is with Dr. Marvin Konstam, 31 years ago, as they performed the first heart transplant at Tufts Medical Center. In the second photo, Dr. Salem is with the person who is writing this here blog post on band wagons.

Now, would you like to join the band wagon of people who keep telling me I look way too good to have had heart surgery a scant two weeks ago?

Because I always like to join the band wagon of people polite enough to express thanks when they are feeling gratitude, here’s a message to all those who helped me create this post and to all those who are reading it, here and now:

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Categories: heart surgery, personal growth, photojournalism, self-care | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

Day 1280: Day and Night

Yesterday,  I was afraid to venture out into the light of a beautiful weekend day, because I’d been running fevers for three days and two nights.

Here are my photos from  the day:

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All those photos reminded me of people I love, which lightened my day.

When day turned into night, I heard that Elie Wiesel had passed into “that good night” . I spent last night  reading his first and most famous book,  Night, about the Holocaust.

Now, it’s another day.

What helps change your personal night into day? My answer has to include  music, movies, and dance.

Daily, I believe that a blog post without a comment is like day without night (or vice versa).

Thanks to all who turn my nights into day, including you.

Categories: in memoriam, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , | 32 Comments

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