Posts Tagged With: Boston Marathon

Day 1932: Fit

This morning, I’m reading news reports about people being fit or unfit for their jobs.

What makes somebody fit or unfit? I wonder.  I also wonder what else I’m going to fit into today’s blog post.

Yesterday, my Fitbit measured another day of over 10,000 steps, as I work on getting more fit.

The weather around here does not fit my expectations for mid-April. I’m continuing to fit into my winter coat as I brave the cold, rainy days and nights.

Today, many people will be fitting themselves into running shoes and into the crowds at the Boston Marathon. I’m assuming some people will get fit and others might throw a fit because of traffic and other obstacles.

Tax day can give people fits.  I almost had a fit yesterday when I noticed that my tax payment wasn’t withdrawn from my bank account as I had scheduled.  I think it’s fitting that I have fewer fits in the future, because there’s only so much we can fit into each precious day.

I take photos as I see fit.

 

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Work with me, people, and please fit your thoughts and feelings about this blog post into a comment below.

What music fits here?

 

No matter what the topic of the blog post, gratitude is always a good fit.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 30 Comments

Day 101: Bill Rodgers stopped to tie his shoe

Yesterday, my son’s father told us something I didn’t know, during a discussion about Bill Rodgers, who won both the Boston and New York City Marathons many times in the 1970s. We were talking about what an incredible runner he was, and I mentioned that I had seen a documentary about running where they described him as “perfectly built to run marathons.”

Then my son’s dad said this:

“Famously, during a Boston Marathon where he broke a record, he stopped during the race to tie his shoe.”

I immediately knew that was my blog post for today.

That is such a wonderful, compact little story.  And such a great image, too.  Bill Rodgers, in the middle of a race where he is (unaware) on pace to break the record, stopping calmly to tie his shoe.

And, there are so many ways to “read” that story.

What conclusions do you draw about it? What does that tell you about him, as a runner and as a person?

How do you make meaning of that?

Even among the people involved in that discussion yesterday, there were some different conclusions:

He was smart, because if he didn’t stop, he might have tripped.

Because he was so much better than anybody in the race, he could afford to do that.

And when I googled “Bill Rodgers stopping to tie his shoe” this morning, I noticed it being used to make different points (including The Paramount Importance of Shoe Lacing).

But this is how I immediately heard that story yesterday:

If you’re going to run the race, you need to stop and take care of yourself.

because that’s the lesson I need to be re-learning, right now.

As I’m writing this post this morning, I’m realizing this, too:  Bill Rodgers Stopping To Tie His Shoe could also be a perfect illustration of two other phrases I have found to be helpful (for myself and for other people):

#1.  You have all the time you need.

#2.  Lose your investment in the outcome.

What a great story.

So, thanks to Bill Rodgers, to my son’s dad, and to you, for reading today.

Categories: personal growth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

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