Posts Tagged With: Bette Midler

Day 2885: Look into the distance

Yesterday, after a restorative Nia (Non-Impact Aerobics) class on ZOOM, the wonderful instructor Suzanne Cohen told us to spend the day using our eyes to look into the distance, because we spend so much time with our eyes focused on screens (like now!).

When I look into the distance, I see

  • hope,
  • change,
  • joy,
  • sadness,
  • all the feelings,
  • celebrations,
  • disappointments,
  • hard work,
  • restorations,
  • reparations,
  • losses,
  • gains,
  • beauty, and
  • so much more.

What do you see when you look into the distance with me?

Sometimes, when we look into the distance, we see ourselves. If we widen our perspective, we might see …

… everything.

Here‘s Bette Midler singing “From a Distance.”

When I look into the distance, I also see gratitude, which is close at hand.

Categories: 2020 U.S. Presidential election, gratitude, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism, Trump stickers | Tags: , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 2663: Comfort Plan

I think most of us need a comfort plan these days, so I was glad to see this in my hospital room yesterday:

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How would you fill in your own personal comfort plan?  For me, it’s connecting and communicating with people I love …

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… eating healthy food …

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… looking forward to better days ahead …

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… noticing the beauty around me …

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… treating myself ….

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… self care …

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… a peaceful environment and quiet rest …

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… taking reasonable precautions …

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… sharing photos and thoughts with you through this blog…

… and listening to comforting music.

 

Part of my comfort plan is to express gratitude, every day.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

Day 2565: What could possibly go wrong?

These days, I don’t ask myself “What could possibly go wrong?”  because I know the answer might be:

  • every little (and big) thing one’s catastrophizing mind might think of and
  • other things, too.

Asking myself “What could possibly go wrong?”  is not my favorite waste of time, because expected and unexpected things go wrong every minute, every hour, every day.

However, there is a way of asking that question that assumes a positive outcome. For example, what could possibly go wrong if I share all my photos from yesterday?

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And what could possibly go wrong if I share another version of “You’re My Favorite Waste of Time”?

Finally, what could possibly go wrong if I ask for comments and express gratitude to all my readers, including YOU?

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

Day 831: How do you tell the story?

I am starting my story today with the last picture I took yesterday, in my office.

I wrote that in a therapy session, where somebody  was  telling a personal story with paralyzingly harsh self-judgment  and hopelessness about the future.

I have witnessed, many times, how people can get stuck in negative stories about themselves, ignoring  positive exceptions and different perspectives.

Yesterday, I encouraged that person in therapy to

  • let go of an overwhelming and crippling sense of personal failure,
  • to  see themselves as the hero of their own story, and
  • to allow for the possibility of hope and change.

And by the end of the session, there were some glimmers of hope about the future.

How are you telling your own story these days, to yourself and to others? Are you the hero of your own story? I hope so, because who else could possibly play that role, in The Story of You?

How might I tell the story of the photos I took yesterday, presented here in chronological order?

  

        

    

  

    

Each of us could tell the story of those pictures in many different ways — depending upon what we notice and the history and assumptions we bring to those images.

I’ll tell you my story of this photo:

Everybody is self centered. The difference is the size of the radius.

And here’s my story about these two:

I have no idea how those photos got on my iPhone.

As I often see in clients (and in myself, too), negative stories tend to stick, leaving less room for the positive ones.

For example, 10 days ago, a cardiologist told a doom-filled, scarily negative story to me, about me, my health, and my future, even though he had just met me and had no medical tests on hand about my very unusual heart.  Ever since that very upsetting encounter,  I’ve  been trying to get that negative story out of my head, by telling parts of it here and elsewhere.

Retelling a story sometimes includes rewriting new dialogue. For instance, since I was too shocked to respond to that cardiologist telling me that —  if I didn’t have  valve surgery  as soon as possible — I would “die a miserable death, ” I am now wishing I had changed that story by replying:

Well, at least I am not living your miserable life.

I don’t know if that’s the best way to tell that story, but I am hoping that telling and re-telling the story of that miserable doctor’s visit — with or without new dialogue — will help me let that story go.

Based on the advice of several people I respect,  I am seriously considering telling the full story of my awful meeting with that doctor to the appropriate hospital authorities.  My main reasons for doing that would be

  1. to prevent other people from telling an upsetting story about encountering this doctor in the future and
  2. to help put that anxiety-provoking story behind me, as I prepare for a less invasive surgery on May 4th and allow room for the more hopeful and complete stories my long-time doctors are telling about my unusual, story-telling  heart.

What will I do in the future, with that upsetting doctor story? I am in the process of figuring out what will benefit me and my personal story, going forward. In other words, the ending of that  story hasn’t been written, yet.

Speaking of ending a story, what musical story should I include, now?

Bette Midler tells an amazing story, doesn’t she?

Many thanks to Bette Midler and to all who help me tell my story in a hopeful and healthy way, and special thanks to you — of course!– for reading my story, today.

Categories: inspiration, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 42 Comments

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