Day 2384: 2 c or not 2 c

Yesterday, I chose to see this at a hospital parking lot …

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… and it occurred to me that we choose what to see and what not to see.

For example, because my eye was red yesterday …

 

… I chose 2  C  several eye-related things.

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Because I have an unusual heart, I often choose 2 C heart-related things.

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Because it’s Pride Week, I chose 2 C this:

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Because I want to avoid collisions, I chose 2 C these:

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Here are more things I chose 2 C yesterday:

 

Were U able 2 C that these socks …

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… are Ouija Board socks?  I choose 2 C that those socks are 4 people who want 2 C into the future.

I choose 2 C that Prince‘s song “I Would Die 4 U” is on YouTube, at least 4 now:

I also choose 2 C that Prince’s birthday is tomorrow, June 7.   I also choose 2 C that tomorrow is the start of the Northeastern Society for Group Psychotherapy’s annual conference in Boston.

What do you choose 2 C and not 2 C in today’s blog post?

I always choose 2 C gratitude, so thanks 2 all who helped me 2 create this “2 C or not 2 C” post and — of course! — 2 U!

 

 

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Day 2383: Come inside and be foolish

Yesterday, when I was walking outside and being foolishly apprehensive about writing and delivering a “Report from the President” at a group therapy conference this weekend, I saw an invitation to come inside and be foolish.

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Personally, I appreciate any invitation to come inside and accept all my different parts (from foolish to wise). How about you?

Here’s my next foolish thought:  “The Fool” is the most evolved of all the Jungian archetypes.

The Fool/Jester archetype urges us to enjoy the process of our lives. Although the Fool/Jester can be prone to laziness and dissipation, the positive Fool/Jester invites us all out to play — showing us how to turn our work, our interactions with others, and even the most mundane tasks into FUN. The goal of the Fool/Jester is perhaps the wisest goal of all, which is just to enjoy life as it is, with all its paradoxes and dilemmas.

This fool now wants to look at a definition of “foolish.”

fool·ish
/ˈfo͞oliSH/
adjective
(of a person or action) lacking good sense or judgment; unwise.
“it was foolish of you to enter into correspondence.”

synonyms: stupid, silly, idiotic, halfwitted, witless, brainless, mindless, thoughtless, imprudent, incautious, irresponsible, injudicious, indiscreet, unwise, unintelligent, unreasonable; ill-advised, ill-considered, impolitic, rash, reckless, foolhardy, lunatic; absurd, senseless, pointless, nonsensical, inane, fatuous, ridiculous, laughable, risible, derisible; informal,: dumb, dim, dimwitted, dopey, gormless, damfool, half-baked, harebrained, crackbrained, peabrained, wooden-headed, thickheaded, nutty, mad, crazy, dotty, batty, dippy, cuckoo, screwy, wacky; informal barmy, daft; informal: glaikit; informal:dumb-ass, chowderheaded; informal: dotish

“her desperation led her to do something foolish”

Her desperation led her to do something foolish; my desperation leads me to blogging. (Of course, everything leads me to blogging; I’ve been writing a daily blog in the morning for almost seven years.)  (But what fool is counting?)

And if it’s foolish for me to write this blog before writing my report from the President, so be it.

Speaking of foolish, is it foolish for me to be worried about the stupid, silly, idiotic, halfwitted, witless, brainless, mindless, thoughtless, imprudent, incautious, irresponsible, injudicious, indiscreet, unwise, unintelligent, unreasonable, ill-advised, ill-considered, impolitic, rash, reckless, foolhardy, lunatic, absurd, senseless, pointless, nonsensical, inane, fatuous, ridiculous, laughable, risible, derisible, dumb, dim, dimwitted, dopey, gormless, damfool, half-baked, harebrained, crackbrained, peabrained, wooden-headed, thickheaded, nutty, mad, crazy, dotty, batty, dippy, cuckoo, screwy, wacky, barmy, daft, glaikit, dumb-ass, chowderheaded, and dotish reports from and about another President?

Worry is always foolish, because it doesn’t help anything.

Let’s be  glaikit (Scottish word meaning foolish, giddy) together and look at my other foolish fotos from yesterday!

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Michael was foolish enough to make LOTS of those delicious cod cakes last night. And I was foolish enough to clean my plate.

My first week of blogging, I was foolish enough to write a post about procrastination.  After going inside that old post, I’m foolishly quoting it here:

if I AM going to wait until the last minute to do something, I wish to heaven I could block that procrastinated task totally out of my mind. But that’s not how it works for me. Usually, I’m exquisitely and uncomfortably aware of what I’m avoiding. Geesh. There’s got to be a way for procrastination to be more fun.

As I’ve gotten older, I have become more forgiving about my procrastinating tendencies. I’ve also realized that procrastination for me often has to do with insecurity. For example, I almost always wait until the last minute to do something that I think I might conceivably suck at doing — or, at least, where I might fall short of my own expectations and wishes.

One thing I’ve historically procrastinated about is …….. writing.

Maybe I procrastinate because I’m foolishly afraid of appearing foolish.

Here‘s the foolish song going through my foolish head, here and now:

 

Come inside and be foolish with a comment, below!

Finally, I shall finish this foolish post with a foolish foto to express my thanks to all those who helped me write today’s post and — of course! —  to YOU.  No fooling!

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism, definition | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 23 Comments

Day 2382: The Pest Reliever

Sometimes, the first photo I take affects how I see things for the rest of the day, as well as the contents of my next blog.

Here’s the first photo I took yesterday:

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It’s a relief to share that I can see myself as a kind of pest reliever — relieving  what pesters my patients and also myself. Those pests include:

  • shame,
  • worry,
  • stress,
  • anxiety,
  • depression,
  • perfectionism,
  • traumatic memories, and
  • harsh judgments (like the inner critic).

Pest relievers can include:

  • acceptance,
  • appreciation,
  • forgiveness,
  • humor,
  • welcoming all feelings,
  • self-expression,
  • self-care,
  • care for others,
  • compassion,
  • celebrating,
  • being in the moment,
  • nature, and
  • community.

Let’s see if there are any pest relievers in my other photos from yesterday (presented as taken chronologically, so I don’t pester myself about any “right or wrong” order):

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Michael’s cooking is definitely a pest reliever.   I sometimes pester Michael for his cooking secrets to share here: there’s no pesto on that salmon, but rather a delicious lime, mint, and fresh peach sauce.

Music can be another pest reliever, so here’s “Voodoo Mambo” from The Pest, starring John Leguizamo.

 

Now I’m going to be a pest and ask for comments, below.

As always, a great pest reliever is gratitude, so thanks to all who helped me create this pest-reliever post and thanks to you — of course! — for visiting.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism, therapy | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Day 2381: M.I.A.

Last night, at a Sunday working meeting to prepare for next weekend’s group therapy conference, somebody told me they thought I’d been M.I.A. for the last few days. I had many thoughts about that, including:

  • “Missing In Action”?  I’ve been right here all along!
  • Does that mean I’ve been Missing Important Action?
  • Has my responsiveness and accessibility changed since my son came home for the summer?
  • People notice when I’m missing!
  • I’m missing my very close friend from the organization, who passed away this time last year.
  • I don’t like to miss anything.

Last night, I dreamed about being lost with my sister and my son, leaving them to find help, and then missing my phone and ways to get back to them.  I was searching desperately for everything that was missing, over and over again, and then told somebody in my dream, “I can never get a break!”

I woke up deciding to write about M.I.A. Then I noticed that, as usual,  the action in some of my latest photos fit the action of my daily topic. I don’t want you to be missing any of those pictures, so here they are:

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Here‘s “Borders” by M.I.A.

I don’t want to be missing the action in your comments, so please leave one below.

Gratitude is never M.I.A. here, so thanks to all who helped me create today’s post and — of course! — to YOU.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 2380: The goods

Yesterday, as I was looking for

  • a good haircut,
  • good people,
  • good conversation,
  • good animals,
  • good gifts,
  • good places to hang,
  • good books,
  • good reflections,
  • good walks,
  • good advice,
  • good neighbors,
  • good memories,
  • good homes,
  • good puns,
  • good food,
  • good weather,
  • good material for this blog,
  • and other goods,

I encountered the word “good” (and other good words) several times. Can you find the goods in the good amount of photos that I took yesterday?

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Did you spot the goods?

Good people who have been reading this blog for a good many years might have recognized our good neighbor Karen and her good dog, Faxy, among all the other good images.

Also, I took two  good shots of this good mural …

… during a good walk through the good Neponset River Reservation because my good son and good boyfriend were trying to guess what was on the missing panel (in the upper left corner next to the good bee).  What would be your good guess?

What would be a good song to include in this post?

Gratitude is always good, so thanks to all who helped me create today’s good enough blog post and — of course! — to YOU, my good readers.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 30 Comments

Day 2379: Growing pains

Sometimes, when I’m trying to make sense of what’s happening with my country, I attribute it to growing pains.

Here’s a definition of growing pains:

grow·ing pains
/ˈɡrōiNG ˌpānz/
noun
neuralgic pains which occur in the limbs of some young children.
the difficulties experienced in the early stages of an enterprise.
“the growing pains of a young republic”

Earlier this week, Vivian (who continues to grow since co-facilitating Coping and Healing groups with me over a year ago), sent me this in a text message:

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Vivian (who is never a pain) also sent me this:

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Obviously, Frances Cannon has undergone some growing pains and we can all benefit from those.

Yesterday, after a day filled with some painful growth, I left a voicemail message for a lovely co-worker — who is experiencing some growing pains at work — suggesting that she take a break from her pain and anxiety about potentially doing the wrong thing,  by welcoming it.  While that may seem painfully counter-intuitive, that advice comes from my own experience.  In the 1990s, when I was experiencing growing pains and almost debilitating anxiety at my first social work internship, one morning I looked at myself in the mirror and said, “Ann!  Today you are going to celebrate making mistakes and enjoy people getting angry at you.” That self-intervention helped me tolerate the growing pains of becoming a social worker, working within a hospital system, and learning to be a group therapist.

Let’s see if there’s any evidence of growing pains in today’s pictures, shall we?

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It’s sometimes a pain for me to decide what music to include in these posts,  because there are so many choices! This image …

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… reminded me of the Pharrell Williams lyrics “Clap along if you feel like a room without a roof” so let’s do this:

Also, in honor of the Who being named world’s loudest  rock band in 1976 …

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… let’s do this, from an April 1, 1976 Who Concert in Boston (my hometown, where I’ve experienced lots of growing pains).

 

I’m looking forward to the comments section, below, growing with your comments.

 

Gratitude always helps with the pain of growing, so thanks to all who helped me create this “growing pains” post and — of course! — to YOU.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

Day 2378: Practicing happiness

Yesterday, at a Coping and Healing group where we were practicing reframes, forgiveness, the serenity prayer,  acceptance of ourselves and others, and some new perspectives,  one of the group members spoke about the concept of practicing happinesss — much like one practices a musical instrument. We practiced that by going around the room and naming specific ways we could practice happiness, starting now.

One of my named ways to practice happiness was listening to music I love.

I heard “Down the Line” last night by Jacob Collier (who has obviously been practicing a lot) as I was walking down the line through the Fenway after work.

I’ve also been practicing happiness daily by blogging and by taking the photos I share here at The Year(s) of Living Non-Judgmentally.  Can you see any examples of practicing happiness in today’s pictures?

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Voila!  When you practice happiness, just like when you practice anything else, you get better at it.

I look forward to practicing happiness later by reading comments, below, about how you might practice happiness, here and now.

Practicing happiness includes expressing gratitude, so thanks to all who helped me write this practicing-happiness post and thanks to you, for reading it.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 2377: Baggage

One thousand, four hundred and twenty-three days ago (but who’s counting?), I wrote another post titled “Baggage,” which was about arriving in Edinburgh without baggage, because the airline had temporarily lost it.  I notice, as I re-read that old baggage post today, that I focused less on the pain of the loss and more on the positives of being in a city I love with people I love. Perhaps that’s one way to get rid of baggage — to focus on what’s right in your life rather than focusing on what’s wrong.

Here are some quotes I’m finding about baggage at BrainyQuote:

You carry your country with you, it’s part of your baggage. — Roy Thomson

We humans have millions of years of evolutionary baggage that makes us regard competition in a deadly light. — Vernor Vinge

Painful events leave scars, true, but it turns out they’re largely erasable. Jill Bolte Taylor, the neuroanatomist who had a stroke that obliterated her memory, described the events as “losing 37 years of emotional baggage.” — Martha Beck

Simplicity is making the journey of this life with just baggage enough.Charles Dudley Warner

We all have our baggage, and I think the trick is not resisting it but accepting it, understanding that the worst experience has a valuable gift inside if you’re willing to receive it.  — Jeannette Walls

One of the main topics of yesterday’s Coping and Healing group was baggage:

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Later in the day, I noticed this:

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Apparently, everything has baggage, even bubbles.

Do you see any baggage in the rest of my photos from yesterday?

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Sometimes I invite people to leave their baggage outside the door, reminding them they can always pick it up on their way out.  At the same time, I welcome all baggage and anything else people want to bring in.

Here‘s “Baggage” by Mary J. Blige:

 

Here’s a song from Rent with the lyrics, “I’ve been trying, I’m not lying. Nobody’s perfect, I’ve got baggage.” “Life’s too short, babe, time is flying, I’m looking for baggage that goes with mine.”

 

Feel free to leave or share any baggage here.

Thanks to all who helped me write my 2nd baggage post and — of course! — to you, for reading it.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments

Day 2376: What other people think about you is none of your business.

When I was minding my own business the other day and watching an episode of RuPaul’s Drag Race — in which some contestants were very concerned about what other contestants thought about them — RuPaul got down to business and said something I had never heard before:

What other people think about you is none of your business.

Because RuPaul’s business includes helping people feel more self-esteem, RuPaul (who doesn’t seem to care what other people think) made sure that the contestants all repeated that phrase, several times.

Because I’m in the therapy business, I shared that phrase at yesterday’s Coping and Healing group, where 75% of all the participants  had suffered insomnia the night before.  I think it’s now my business to share my photos from yesterday:

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Because many people make it their business to like Michael’s cooking, last night he served baked cod with pineapple relish.

Several people’s businesses on YouTube include creating videos about today’s important phrase, including this and this:

Is it anybody’s business that “What Other People Think of You is None of Your Business” is attributed to many people?  Here’s Deepak Chopra’s version of it:

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Here‘s Salt-N-Pepa with “None of Your Business.”

What you think about me is  none of my business, but I still welcome your comments, below.

I make it my business to express gratitude every day, so thanks to all who help  me with my business of blogging and — of course! — to YOU.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

Day 2375: Fun for the whole fam

When I was at Marshall’s the other day with my fam but not with my fam-ous cell phone, I took this photo with a fam member’s phone:

The next day, I saw this whole fam of snowy egrets having fun close to where I live with my fam.

I didn’t want to disturb the fun of that whole fam, so I hope I got close enough for you to have fun with those photos.

Here are some fun photos of MY fam:

 

How about sharing a fun photo or story about your fam, below? And remember, it’s your choice who is part of your fam.

Here’s a whole fun song about fam:

Fun thanks for being part of my whole blogging fam, here and now.

Categories: family, fun, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , | 18 Comments

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