Day 1534: Weather Report

The weather report, here and now:

WINTER Storm Warning REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 5 PM EDT THIS AFTERNOON…

Locations: The I-95 corridor of Rhode Island and Massachusetts.
Hazard types: Heavy wet snow and strong winds.
Accumulations: Snow accumulation of 6 to 12 inches.
Timing: Snow develops through 8 AM this morning and becomes heavy by mid to late morning. The snow will fall at 2 to 4 inches per hour before changing to sleet and then rain between 2 and 5 PM.
IMPACTS: The heavy wet snow and strong winds may result in tree damage and scattered power outages. Roads may become impassable with very heavy snowfall rates…near blizzard conditions for a short time and strong damaging winds. Travel is not recommended.
Winds: Northeast 20 to 30 mph with gusts up to 60 mph.
Visibilities: One quarter mile or less at times.

In order to weather this weather, I’m not reporting to work today. Instead, I’ll weather whatever weather there is on Friday and work that day instead.

My internal weather report, here and now:

I’m weathering whatever weather there is, whether or not I feel strong, ready, or brave.

What’s the weather report where you are?

Here’s my pictorial  weather report for the day:

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How’s your internal weather, after that pictorial report?

Here‘s one of my favorite tunes from Weather Report, live:

 

Whether it’s rain, shine, or snow, my thanks to all who helped me create today’s weather report and to you — of course! — for weathering it.

 

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 66 Comments

Day 1533: Empowerment

What does empowerment mean to you?

To me, empowerment means positively realizing and using personal power.

To the dictionary, empowerment means this:

em·pow·er·ment
əmˈpouərmənt/
noun
authority or power given to someone to do something.
“individuals are given empowerment to create their own dwellings”
the process of becoming stronger and more confident, especially in controlling one’s life and claiming one’s rights.
“political steps for the empowerment of women”

Empowerment can be a powerful matter of survival, especially when balances of power are powerfully misaligned.

Do you see empowerment in the pictures I was empowered to take yesterday?

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Here are “Top 10 Girl Power Songs” from watchmojo.com on YouTube:

 

I now empower myself to express gratitude to all who helped me create this Empowerment post and to you — of course! — for being here, now.

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments

Day 1532: What are you grateful for?

What are you grateful for?

I’m grateful for bumper stickers that help me think and blog.

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I’m grateful for people who question  assumptions and for the National Park Service.

I’m grateful for dishwashers, dogs, and funny pictures of animals.

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I’m grateful for doctors, nurses, and other medical treaters who have kept me alive for sixty-four years of  happiness, kindness, love, and treats.

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I’m grateful for cats and cucumbers, which appear together in several videos on YouTube including this one:

 

 

I’m grateful for not being afraid of cucumbers.

I’m grateful for all  who help me create this grateful blog  and I’m grateful to YOU!

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Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 34 Comments

Day 1531: I miss a lot of things

In my therapy groups, after I write on the board the themes and topics I hear in the room, I say, “I miss a lot of things,” because

  • I’m inviting people to make sure that everything that’s important to them is listed on the board and
  • I miss a lot of things.

I miss a lot of things because my imperfect mind is incapable of noticing and retaining everything that happens around me.

I also miss a lot of things because, no matter what we do, people leave and things change.

Do I  miss a lot of things, here and now?

I miss:

  • my late parents,
  • our previous President,
  • people I used to work with,
  • some of my classmates, and
  • living near the ocean, as I did when I was a child.

Do you miss a lot of things?

I miss a lot of things when I take pictures.  Here’s the latest batch:

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Did you miss the bunny kisses? The soap, in two photos?  The glue? The misplaced meal? My new custom-made t-shirt?  Boston?  Something I brought home from a hotel in Edinburgh? Two cartoons I missed when I first published this post an hour ago? If you missed those things,  look again.

I miss a lot of things, but today I’m not missing music

 

… and I’m not missing the opportunity to thank those who helped me create this post and to thank YOU.

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Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 48 Comments

Day 1530: Obscure Sorrows

Earlier this year, I wrote a post referring to John Koenig‘s Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, which is “a compendium of invented words” “to give a name to emotions we all might experience but don’t yet have a word for.”

Yesterday, in my therapy group  (where  I’m always on the lookout for obscure sorrows and other feelings), one of the members brought in three entries from The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows.

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While some things in those photos might be obscure, people in the group last night noticed that two of those obscure words were real and only one — Altschmerz — really belongs in the Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows. People did not obscure their appreciation for the relevancy of the real word Weltschmerz:

Weltschmerz is the depressing feeling you get when comparing the actual state of the world to the picture in your head of how the world should be, and knowing that the picture in your head can never exist.

We also discussed the obscure sorrows created by the cognitive distortion of comparisons, especially when we compare ourselves to how we used to be or how we think we should be.

Do you see any obscure sorrows in some recent pictures in my head (and in my iPhone) that can exist in this blog?

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I feel self-compassion as I admit that I sometimes obscure sorrows with lots of pictures.

Here‘s John Koenig giving the TED talk “The conquest of new words” (which was in an link obscured in the first paragraph of this Obscure Sorrows post):

Are there any obscure sorrows or other feelings you’d like to share in a comment, below?

I will not obscure my thanks to all who helped me create this post and to you — of course! — no matter what obscure feelings or thoughts you’re having, here and now.

 

Categories: group therapy, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Day 1529: Compassion will make you beautiful

I hope you have compassion for the beautiful teabag I encountered yesterday morning:

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Do you believe that compassion will make you beautiful?  Do you see beautiful compassion in any of my other photos from yesterday?

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That is the beautifully compassionate Dr. Deeb Salem. When I asked him yesterday how he thought I was doing, his compassionate  reply was, “I think you’re doing great.” Isn’t that beautiful?

Here‘s a beautiful and compassionate song.

Thanks to all the beautiful people who helped me create today’s post and to all my beautiful readers — of course! — for having the compassion to visit me, here and now.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 26 Comments

Day 1528: Other people’s worries

Hello, people!  Do you have worries, right now?

If you do have worries, how might that affect me or other people?

Does anybody worry about how your worry might make other people worry?

Don’t worry, people!  I’m now getting to the point of this post.

Lately, as I recover from open heart surgery, I have noticed other people’s worries about me.  Other people’s worries result in worried questions, like “Are you sure you’re up to this?”  “Are you doing too much?”  “Are you taking on too many things, too quickly?”

I’m not worried about these other people’s worries. Instead,  I appreciate their concern.

However, I do not take on their worries.  I’ve got enough worries, of my own.

Today, I’ll be seeing my cardiologist, Dr. Deeb Salem. If he’s worried, THEN I’ll be worried.

Are other people worried about whether I have any photos to share today?

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Don’t worry, people, I’m going to explain that last photo.  Yesterday, a water main broke in the Longwood Medical Area  of Boston.  Other people besides me were very late to work.  Did that worry me?  No.   Did it affect my sense of self worth?  Don’t worry about that, either. I and many other people have been working on keeping our sense of self worth protected from everything that comes at us, including other people’s worries.

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I hope people aren’t worrying about what YouTube video I’m going to share. When I search “Other people’s worries,” THIS comes up:

I’m not worried about those dogs. Are other people worried?

Other people who regularly read this blog are not worried, I’m sure, about whether I’m going to express gratitude to all who helped me create this post or to you — of course! — for being here, now.

 

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism, Psychotherapy | Tags: , , , , , , | 23 Comments

Day 1527: The Element of Surprise

Yesterday, at work, I was surprised to see this:

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Oh my Gawwd!  I can’t believe that I’m still surprised by anything, after all the years and all the experiences I’ve been through.

Would it surprise you to know that I’ve been thinking and talking a lot about surprises lately?

For example, I am no longer surprised by actions and words from people that are completely consistent with what they’ve done and said before. There’s no element of surprise in my saying, over and over again, to anybody who will listen:

That’s just so-and-so being so-and-so.

I think I surprised somebody, yesterday, when he responded to my repeated request for help with, “That is SO low on my list of ….” and I pointed my finger at him and said, “Don’t finish that sentence!”

But that was just so-and-so being so-and-so.

Are there any elements of surprise in my other photos from yesterday?

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There might be an element of surprise in my now posting my voice from a previous post, Day 811: Changing the Inner World.

I won’t be surprised if people are themselves in their comments, below.

Any element of surprise in my ending this post like so?

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… to everyone who helps me create this blog and to you — of course! — for reading it.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 39 Comments

Day 1526: A Window in Time

During a recent window in time, I saw this:

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During that same window in time, I

  • noticed that the time in that window in time was incorrect,
  • looked at a house with lots of windows near the ocean,
  • thought about the healing power of nature, and
  • considered my own mortality.

How will I use the window in time that is today’s blog post?

I will show you the delicious meal my boyfriend Michael in Massachusetts and my son Aaron in Scotland cooked together in a window in time last night.

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Soon after that window in time, I was happily eating a large piece of that by a window.

How else should I use A Window in Time?

I love windows in time to wonderful music.

I hope you use a window in time to leave a comment.

There’s no window in time like the present to express my appreciation to all who helped me create this window-in-time post and to you — of course! — for visiting me during this window in time, here and now.

Categories: personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , | 24 Comments

Day 1525: Distress tolerance

Distress tolerance is an important skill to learn because, no matter who we are, we all encounter distress we need to tolerate.

I’ve been tolerating a lot of distress lately, including

  • open heart surgery,
  • a cardiac pacemaker recall,
  • American politics,
  • rejection,
  • mistakes,
  • loss, and
  • disappointment.

Chances are that you’ve been tolerating distress lately, too.

So how do we tolerate distress?

Personally, I tolerate distress with

  • blogging,
  • music,
  • humor,
  • nature,
  • animals,
  • movies,
  • walks,
  • talks,
  • reading,
  • spending time with people I love,
  • chocolate
  • taking action, and
  • taking pictures.

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Which of those photos are best for your distress tolerance?

For me, these two photos

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… illustrate this important lesson: If you want a cupcake, don’t go for a cookie masquerading as a cupcake.  Get the real thing.

And this picture

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is very good for my distress tolerance, because it shows me that beautiful things can turn up, even when and where you least expect them.

Here‘s Marsha Linehan talking briefly about Distress Tolerance:

And here‘s some music that helps me tolerate distress:

Here’s a joke I just found on YouTube:

Arnold Schwarzenegger works in a record shop and a customer asks him where to find the Brandenburg Concertos.

Arnold answers “Aisle B, Bach”

I’ll be back with another post, tomorrow.

Thanks to all who helped me create this distress-tolerating post and to you — of course! — for tolerating my blog, here and now.

Categories: personal growth, Psychotherapy | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 43 Comments

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