Day 3267: What no one ever says

Today’s title is inspired by many things, including today’s Daily Bitch Calendar.

I may be the only one who says how that is an example of a cognitive distortion, because chances are that SOMEBODY has said that. At this point in my life, it’s hard to believe that no one has ever said anything, which is my way of saying that there might be nothing new under the sun in terms of what people communicate.

Stephen Sondheim, however, said things in his lyrics that people seldom say, like these lines from “The Ladies Who Lunch”:

So here’s to the girls on the go,

Everybody tries.

Look into their eyes

And you’ll see what they know:

Everybody dies.

When I first heard those lines in the 1970’s, I thought, “Stephen Sondheim is saying what no one ever says: ‘Everybody dies.'” And while other people have said it, nobody said it like Sondheim, who died the day after Thanksgiving.

I’m thinking about that line — “Everybody dies” — today because Michael Nesmith passed away yesterday.

No one (including me) ever says that “Everybody Dies” is a good title for this kind of blog, so I didn’t use it today. However, as we get older, “Everybody Dies” rings truer with each loss of somebody we loved.

And I did love Mike Nesmith and the Monkees.

Do you see what no one ever says in my other images for today?

I might assume that no one ever says “Let’s celebrate National Noodle Ring Day,” but I’m probably wrong.

Whether or not someone else says it, this is one of my vivid memories of the Monkees TV show, which seemed to include words that no one ever said before.

This next video includes what Mike and Davy said during their screen tests (which no one ever said during a tryout for a major TV show before).

No one ever says, I hope, that I don’t try to share relevant videos in my blog posts. Here’s another one:

Finally, no one ever says that I end these posts without expressing gratitude for those I appreciate, including YOU.

Categories: in memoriam, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Post navigation

16 thoughts on “Day 3267: What no one ever says

  1. Back when I was a kid watching The Monkees TV show, Ann, I somehow made a mental connection that they were America’s answer to The Beatles. There, I said it.

  2. Everyone will, at times, hurt and be hurt.

  3. Me, too. I loved Michael Nesmith and the Monkees. They were fun and I loved.many if their songs. I also love his mother’s story– that she was a secretary who invented Liquid Paper because of her frustration with typos.

  4. puella33

    I remember the Monkey’s show.

  5. I loved the Monkees as a group and still have at least one vinyl album, maybe two. When Davey Jones died I was kind of shocked into how many years had passed since I was a young teen and loved him! Now, I’m in a similar state reflecting on the loss of Sondheim and Nesmith, and watching “Get Back” with the Beatles, I’ve been very sober. It isn’t that this is the first time I’ve come in contact with a heavy emotional tug as celebrities I’ve admired and have been a part of my youth leave us. It is probably just the emotional toll of two years of collective grief associated with the times we are experiencing. It’s probably appropriate that we mourn. It is sad, and should be. ♥️

  6. I loved, loved the Monkees and told my older sisters that they were stupid to like the Beatles and the Doors more! What did they know, anyway?!

  7. What no one ever says
    Is what Harley and Joan murmured there
    Which mysteries, these tigers share

  8. When I was in kindergarten and my teacher would put on a record a group of us would grab blocks and pretend they were instruments. I had a hat with a bobble on top and I’d put it on. My teacher once said to my mother, “I don’t know why he always puts on that hat.” I never did tell her I was pretending to be Mike Nesmith.
    I envy him and Frank Zappa because they worked so well together.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: