Day 3169: What we can learn from cats

I believe there’s a lot we can learn from cats. The trouble with cats is that they’re not talking, so we have to figure out these lessons for ourselves.

As I observe our two cats, I learn to be more in the moment, letting go of regret about the past and fears about the future.

Lately, I’ve been watching our cats rather than watching TV.

I also learn that very territorial creatures can somehow work out differences and coexist in the same place, without bloodshed.

Can you learn anything from my other images today?

Maybe we can learn something from the song “Everybody Wants to be a Cat.”

What do you think we can learn from cats? I know I can learn from your comments, below.

I am grateful to all the cool cats I learn from, including YOU!

Categories: life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

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13 thoughts on “Day 3169: What we can learn from cats

  1. I ordered the Anxiety and Phobia workbook and hope there a chapter in dealing with an interminable pandemic snd the anxiety it creates

  2. I learned from Puffy that he wanted me to wear my hair the way he carefully styled it with his paws, Ann. Then I learned from Toby that he did not want to come sit o my lap until Puffy was no longer there; then I was his pal.

  3. Harley is coming out from behind the curtain (sometimes). I would definitely be watching Harley and Joan more than TV in your house.

    How wonderful these photos are.

    Let’s be more like Harley and Joan.

  4. Cats really are fascinating. If they could talk, I imagine they’d be very sardonic and witty.

  5. We should listen to cats who tell us to take advantage of a nap whenever we can, stretch several times a day to keep supple, get up often and turn around to ease the muscles, keep ourselves clean and well groomed and maintain our nails in tip top condition, and drink plenty of water!

  6. Baudelaire compared cats to the Sphinx, endlessly dreaming, and I think we can learn from both Joan and Harley that dreams take many forms.

  7. I wonder what Harley thinks well observing Joan dash in and out of that tunnel?

  8. Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities. It is considered to be an innate tendency of human beings within the field of psychology. What I learned from my first and only cat, (which lived 25 years), is that he could be extremely ‘cruel’ because his hunter instinct was so well developed and superior to dogs. Of course, this my anthropomorphism applied to the situation.

    My cat was allowed to use a small balcony but a times he climbed out and hunted. He once brought me at least two fledglings and ate them alive in front of me. I remember hearing the pain and agony of the birds and he chewed them alive. Of course, my cat didn’t always do this because I eventually moved out of the dwelling. However, after this experience, I learned that cats are MASTER hunters, genetically linked to their prehistoric feline ancestors. They can become great pets, but they have a wild side. Dogs also have it. However, I’ve learned that cats are more adept in finding food than dogs, are more agile and dexterous, usually live longer, and tolerate more pain.

    • For me, cats are CUNNING:

      cunning-adjective

      1.having or showing skill in achieving one’s ends by deceit or evasion.

      cunning-noun

      2. skill in achieving one’s ends by deceit.

      For me they’re considered masters of DECEIT, hence their success in catching prey! They’re masterful at fooling their victims, and surpass dogs in this matter. However, as pets I like their independence from humans. This is topic for another discussion though.

  9. i find them endlessly fascinating, and learn something about life every day from them –

  10. Cats seem to embody old souls, so wisdom is there for us to observe. I think observing your cats is infinitely more a good use of time than at least a lot of what is considered entertainment. It can be wonderful thinking time!

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