Day 2826: Blind spots

A Merriam-Webster definition of “blind spot” would hit the spot:

BLIND SPOT
1a: the small circular area at the back of the retina where the optic nerve enters the eyeball and which is devoid of rods and cones and is not sensitive to light
— called also optic disk

— see EYE ILLUSTRATION
b: a portion of a field that cannot be seen or inspected with available equipment

2: an area in which one fails to exercise judgment or discrimination

Examples of blind spot in a Sentence
When driving on the highway, you need to make sure no one is in your blind spot before changing lanes.
She has a blind spot concerning her son’s behavior.

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Do you see any blind spots in that definition or in my images from yesterday?
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Have you noticed that millions of people in the United States have  huge blind spots?

Sometimes I wonder if the format for these blog posts creates blind spots and whether people miss some of the words I put in spots. I try to keep wonder from turning into worry, because worry creates blind spots for me.

Let’s see if there are any blind spots on YouTube.

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Blind spots don’t get in the way of my finding gratitude, wherever I look.

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Categories: definition, life during the pandemic, personal growth, photojournalism | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 30 Comments

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30 thoughts on “Day 2826: Blind spots

  1. Thank you for allowing me to peek around the bushes to see the girl on the truck side, Ann.

  2. if we were perfect we’d learn nothing, how boring is that, you are a good teacher, thanks

  3. Makes me wonder what the purpose of a blind spot is. Can’t see any advantage in having one.

    • Thank you for this wonder-ful comment.

      • You’re more than welcome, Ann. You catch me at a good time. I was typing as I walked home and, without looking up, I must have taken a wrong turn and when I did finally look up I found that I didn’t recognise anything around me! I just saw something familiar as I looked up from typing this reply, which means I’m not lost – Yay! I wish I could think of a good punch line to this but I can’t. 🙂

      • I think the punch line is that you temporarily ran into a blind spot!

      • Haha – I certainly did! 😂

  4. I don’t think the blog layout creates blind spots for me, in the sense that I miss words. I usually look for all your words. But quite often when I browse through a lot of photos, something that I meant to say about an earlier section, I’ll forget. Or, you’ll have several different interesting things to comment on and I’ll only pick one because I don’t have time to make a long response. So it could look like there are blind spots but I don’t think that’s the case. I realize that makes my responses sometimes seem insensitive, because I might comment on something that Michael cooked and neglect to say something about a very special memory you shared. However, I know that other readers will likely comment on that part, and our response is in a way collective. Also, I know that you understand that the thing that I say in response, likely doesn’t represent all that I would say if we were in person.

  5. Speaking of blind spots, did you know that the United States is building a wall right now between Aldergrove BC and Washington State? Loved ones separated by the border by the pandemic have been talking to each other across the invisible border in farming fields where two roads run parallel very close to each other, and that made the news, probably prompting the wall although watchful border patrols had seemed to smile on the practice. The wall started going up without any notice (Even to Canada Customs or the police or neighbors facing it), causing a lot of consternation. Canadians have been very proud of our two countries’ wall-less and undefended border. The wall is also slightly amusing because of course the border is very long and you could cross it by accident in many places.

  6. I had never known that our common phrase had a biological source. Thanks for that.

  7. Beautiful images Ann. B&W as you see is almost another language, more documentary with visual forms. I like the one which you also repeated in color with the rock on the foreground. Here’s hoping the blind spots can become the third eye one day.

  8. Your photos of the water are enticing. When we can freely move about the cabin again, I’m going to take a trip somewhere coastal!

  9. puella33

    Where is that beautiful port, Ann?

  10. I’m sure I have blind spots but I can’t see them.

  11. i think we all have blind spots, used to protect ourselves, we see things as we choose to see them, rather than as they are, though only a matter of time before they shine through, in spite of our best efforts. i love the clamshell door wreath, it’s clear to see that the person who lives there loves the sea and the girl peeking out from the bush scared me)

  12. I missed this post, it must be a blind spot! (∗ᵒ̶̶̷̀ω˂̶́∗)੭₎₎̊₊♡

  13. Pingback: Day 2831: Categories | The Year(s) of Living Non-Judgmentally

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