Day 319: Paying attention

Some people tell me that’s a skill I have: paying attention.

What’s the secret of paying attention?

Curiosity.

There’s a warning about curiosity, I know:

Curiosity killed the cat.

When I look at that saying, right now, this is what I’m thinking:

Curiosity didn’t kill the cat.  Something else did (e.g., another animal, a car, a trap, etc.).

Don’t blame curiosity OR the cat, please!  (See here for why blame is an unhelpful cognitive distortion.)

Time to go to Wikipedia, for more about that saying:

Curiosity killed the cat” is a proverb used to warn of the dangers of unnecessary investigation or experimentation. A less frequently-seen rejoinder to “curiosity killed the cat” is “but, satisfaction brought it back”.[1]

The original form of the proverb, now little used, was “Care killed the cat”. In this instance, “care” was defined as “worry” or “sorrow.”

Aha!  Haven’t I been telling you that — all year — about worry, dear readers? (See here, here, here, here, and here for  more about that.)

Question: Is anybody curious about how I’m going to end this post?

Answer: With the image that inspired it.

Image

Thanks to cats and other curious creatures everywhere, and to you, especially, for paying attention today.

Categories: personal growth | Tags: , , , | 15 Comments

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15 thoughts on “Day 319: Paying attention

  1. Curiosity is what any writer must nourish – without it – how could we possibly create? 🙂

  2. Nearly all advances in science come from curiosity, and it is a big part of what gives many children such an awesome view of life. Thank you for the reminders, Ann.
    Russ

  3. Love this post dear Ann, and especially the “… but, satisfaction brought it back.” 🙂

  4. 😉 😉

  5. Love all the comments. Thanks!

  6. My mother used to say “curiosity killed the cat…. but information brought him back”
    Good proverb

  7. Pingback: Day 1897: Attention | The Year(s) of Living Non-Judgmentally

  8. Pingback: Day 2326: Special Attention | The Year(s) of Living Non-Judgmentally

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