Day 213: Transitions, Part 2

I am about to go out on a two-week vacation from work.

This is the first time, in perhaps decades, where I have taken that much time away from a current job. (I’ve taken two weeks between jobs, but that’s different.)

I have two more days to get things at work in “good enough” shape before I leave for two whole weeks.

My urge, when I woke up this morning, was to write about transitions.

Based on what I’ve been learning about myself this year (and, also, because of my good -enough memory), I was pretty sure that I had written about the topic of transitions before I went out on my most recent, one-week vacation three months ago (in May).

I checked The Blog Archives here and, sure enough, I wrote a post called, “Transitions,” the day before I left for vacation.

Coincidence?  I think not.

Maybe, this time around, I’m writing about the same topic a day earlier because (1) my vacation, this time, will be twice as long, (2) I’m wiser about how important transitions are, and/or (3) I’m wiser about how naming any source of anxiety can help relieve it, so why wait another day?

And, by the way, it helped me, today, to read that previous post about transitions, especially these resolutions, at the end:

  1. I will do the best I can today,

  2. I will not be perfect in doing all the things I am supposed to do to prepare for this transition, and

  3. I will be doing well for myself  (and for other people), if I can remember # 1 and #2.

So what else do I want to say, right now, that would be helpful for (1) me, definitely and (2) readers, perhaps?

These things:

  1. Transitions — and change, in general — can cause anxiety.
  2. Anxiety isn’t always a problem.  There is such a thing as “healthy anxiety,” which reflects excitement and hope.
  3. We can learn to let go of unhelpful thoughts (including cognitive distortions) which can increase anxiety, in painful way.
  4. The main unhelpful thought I would like to let go of today is: “I HAVE to take care of (fill in task) before I leave on vacation, or else people will feel (disappointed, disconnected, or otherwise dissed). (This seems to be an automatic combo-plate-of-mind-reading-and-fortune-telling thought of mine.)
  5. There is no fifth thing. Four things are enough, for now.

As is my wont whilst creating these blog posts, I would like to include an audio/visual aid (for the benefit of me, definitely, and my audience, perhaps).

Today’s presentation is ….two communities of creatures (observed last night, at a local pet store):

IMG_1344

IMG_1347

And while those chinchillas and finches are stuck, for now, in less than ideal — and perhaps painful — ways of being, I’ve got to hope that (1) better days are ahead for them and (2) they appreciate having each other.

Thanks to creatures who are doing their best, everywhere (and you, for reading).

Categories: personal growth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

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7 thoughts on “Day 213: Transitions, Part 2

  1. I really like your blog, I love the idea of living non-judgmentally and I think it helps as a go-along with my therapy session the other day.

    Enjoy your vacation and know that you help us readers. ❤

  2. findingmyinnercourage

    Do nothing but enjoy your vacation! Have fun!

  3. Gene Phillips

    I am looking forward to your vacation posts, which I will see and read after you have already returned.

  4. Pingback: Day 391: What is the opposite of dreadful? | The Year(s) of Living Non-Judgmentally

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